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The Mohicans of Stockbridge

By Patrick Frazier | Go to book overview

18
THE WAGES OF WAR IS DEATH

The next two years of the Revolution had the most impact on the Indians. In 1779 the three-pronged attack called Sullivan's Campaign was launched against the Six Nations in New York and Pennsylvania. Samuel Kirkland joined Maj. Gen. John Sullivan's army at Easton as chaplain in mid-June, accompanied by Jehoiakim Mtohksin and three other Stockbridges who served as guides directly under the general's commanding staff.1 George Washington at West Point, meanwhile, on June 19 asked William Goodrich to enlist as many of the Stockbridge and Scaticook Indians as possible to join Sullivan's army, which had left Easton, Pennsylvania, just the day before. Washington ordered that the Indians were to receive no more than private's pay, "unless you find it necessary to distinguish the chief of each tribe by some little pecuniary or other encouragement." To Goodrich, who was now a major in the Massachusetts militia, he offered a captain's pay and rations.2

Apparently Goodrich did not like the terms offered by Washington and sent him a note to this effect via Lieut. Solomon Hendricks. Washington stood firm, however, and hinted that because the matter had been delayed so long, the intended party might not be worth the original offer. Hendricks showed Washington a list of thirty-two Indians willing to accept his terms and to form a Stockbridge company for the expedition, with Solomon as their captain. Washington therefore gave Hendricks some sort of commission affirming the terms and stating "the

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