The Czech and Slovak Republics: Nation versus State

By Carol Skalnik Leff | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

No one writes any book alone, however much colleagues, friends, and family may sometimes wish that could be the case. I owe thanks to my colleagues in the political science department and in the Arms Control, Disarmament, and International Security (ACDIS) program at the University of Illinois for their comments on the theoretical issues raised by the postcommunist democratization process, particularly Ed Kolodziej, Roger Kanet, Paul Quirk, and Gerardo Munck. Robin Remington deserves heartfelt appreciation for her scholarship, friendship, and insight in ways that go far beyond her editorship of this series. Special thanks to Andrew Green and John Lepingwell for the temporary diversion from their own research agendas to lend help with invaluable Internet resources; to James Krapfl for his close and intelligent reading of much of the manuscript; and above all to my family--Alison, Ben, and Mark--who allowed me to order them around like a drill sergeant during the final phases of the manuscript's preparation. I hope I've made it up to you. Finally, there are always people who richly deserve thanks for advice and support but who are unaccountably left unmentioned. You know who you are, and my appreciation is nonetheless sincere for the omission.

Carol Skalnik Leff

-xv-

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The Czech and Slovak Republics: Nation versus State
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents ix
  • Tables and Maps xiii
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • Chronology xvii
  • Part 3 the International Dimensions of Domestic Transformation 211
  • 8 Domestic Reform and Integration with the West: the Triple Transition and International Relations 240
  • Selected Bibliography 281
  • About the Book and Author 283
  • Index 285
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