Harder Than War: Catholic Peacemaking in Twentieth-Century America

By Patricia McNeal | Go to book overview

Note on the Sources

In an attempt to locate the origins of the American Catholic peace movement I was able to identify two possible antecedents: the Catholic Association for International Peace (CAIP) and the Catholic Worker movement. Though the latter proved to be the leaven within American Catholicism that fostered the phenomena to emerge in force during the Vietnam era and continue to the present day, both groups had to be presented in order to provide a full understanding of the various approaches to peace- making.


The Catholic Worker Movement

The principal sources used in the preparation of this study were Dorothy Day published writings about her life in the Catholic Worker Movement: From Union Square to Rome ( Maryland: Presentation of the Faith Press, 1939), Houses of Hospitality ( New York: Sheed & Ward, 1939), The Long Loneliness ( New York: Curtis Books, 1952), and Loaves and Fishes ( New York: Harper & Row, 1963). Ammon Hennacy The Autobiography of a Catholic Anarchist ( New Jersey: Libertarian Press, 1952), was also very helpful. The latest edition of the book appears under the title, The Book of Ammon ( Salt Lake City: n.p. 1965). Most essential to any study pertaining to the Catholic Worker is its newspaper, the Catholic Worker. I first used the copies of the newspaper located at St. Charles Borromeo Seminary. Archives in Philadelphia. Significantly, issues published during World War II were missing. The complete newspaper is available on microfilm at the University of Notre Dame. The manuscript collection of Catholic Worker papers, correspondence, and so on, is in the archives at Marquette University. Dorothy Day named William D. Miller her official biographer. His two books, A Harsh and Dreadful Love: Dorothy Day and the Catholic Worker Movement ( New York: Liveright, 1973) and Dorothy Day: A Biography ( San Francisco: Harper & Row, 1982) have been a valuable aid. It must be pointed out that when asked, Day and Miller both contended that there is no pertinent information on peace in the collection at Marquette University.


The Catholic Association for International Peace

The principal source for a study of this group is the CAIP collection located in the archives at Marquette University. Although these papers are open to the public, the

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