Harder Than War: Catholic Peacemaking in Twentieth-Century America

By Patricia McNeal | Go to book overview

Index
abortion issue: and antinuclear issue, 244- 245; and Daniel Berrigan, 223; as focus of American Catholic hierarchy in 1980s, 157
Afghanistan, Soviet invasion of, and draft, 237, 329
African Americans: advice from consulting firm to Josephites on, 187; and Berrigan brothers, 181-182; and Black Panthers, 206; and militancy and separatism in civil rights movement, 187; priests, appointed to Catholic hierarchy, 133
Age of Constantine, and pacifism of primitive Christian church, x, 29
Ahmad, Eqbal, 199, 201, 204; and draft, 237; and Harrisburg Seven trial, 205, 208; and human rights issue, 220. See also Harrisburg Eight case
air raid test demonstrations, 91-92, 122
Alfrink, Bernard, 230
Alinsky, Saul, 133
America, 32, 54, 116, 191; attitude toward obliteration and atomic bombing, 67, 68
American Catholic bishops: aid to Civilian Public Service camps, 269n25; and Catholic Peace Fellowship ad, 145; conflict with Reagan administration, 237; joining Pax Christi--USA, 235, 236; and Jonah House demonstrations, 213; and League of Nations, 7; and nuclear freeze, 243; reorganization after Second Vatican Council, 156-157; Statement on Registration and Conscription for Military Service, 238; support for Franco, 17-18; and Vietnam War. 142, 145, 157-160. See also American Catholic hierarchy; National Conference of Catholic Bishops
American Catholic hierarchy: and abortion issue, 244-245, 257; annual meeting of 1939, 53; and anti--communist crusade, 74; appointment of black priests to, 133; attitude toward Catholic peacemakers, xiii, 146; attitude toward obliteration and atomic bombing, 68; attitude toward United Nations. 52; and bombing of Rome during World War II, 51; and CAIP, xi, 98; and CALCAV, 162; and Catholic immigrants, 1-2; and Catholic participation in civil rights movement, 133; and Catholic Worker call for draft resistance during World War II, 43; and Catholic Worker movement, 22; on causes of World War II, 40; and Central America, 239-240; and Challenge of Peace, 211, 212, 249-258; and Cold War, 51-52; Committee on Reconstruction, 6; and conscientious objectors, 43, 46, 52-54138, 159-160, 165, 166; and conscription during World War II, 45, 65; and debate on ratification of SALT II, 241-242; and draft legislation during World War II, 53-54; focus on domestic concerns, 1-2; as focus of PAX during Vietnam War, 139, 140; and formation of National Catholic War Council, 4; and Harrisburg Seven trial, 207; impact of American Catholic peace movement on, 172; influence of anti-communism on foreign policy positions of, 135-136; influence of Catholic peacemakers on, xiii; influence of Hehir on, 246-247; influence of PAX on, xii, 160; involvement in urban affairs, 133- 134; and isolationism, 51-52; and just war doctrine, x, 69-70; and National Catholic Welfare Council, 4-6; and nuclear weapons freeze campaign, 240; and obliteration bombing, 65; pastoral letter after World War I, 4; pastoral letters on social problems in 1983, ix; and Pax Christi--USA, 230, 234-235; and PAX lobbying at Second

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