Italy: From Revolution to Republic, 1700 to the Present

By Spencer M. Di Scala | Go to book overview

6
Three Models for Unification

From the 1830s until unification, Italian intellectuals ardently discussed not whether the peninsula would be unified but how unification might take place and what would be its future. In interweaving these questions, they produced responses that further stimulated the desire for independence and unity.


The Enduring Myth

By the early 1830s progress toward unification had reached a peak and then stagnated. The idea of unity had achieved widespread acceptance among Italian opinion makers, but the means of achieving this goal remained elusive. The Carboneria and other secret societies had failed: They had demonstrated their capacity to overthrow existing governments but not to challenge Austrian hegemony; their opposition to current conditions appealed to large numbers of people, but their lack of a rigorous ideology failed to galvanize them, and their elaborate rituals masked ineffectiveness.

The man who would reinvigorate the struggle for Italian liberty, Giuseppe Mazzini, became a carbonaro in 1827, the same year he obtained a law degree. A sickly child who later became the epitome of the romantic revolutionary, given to playing the guitar and smoking cigars, Mazzini had aimed at a career in medicine, like his father, but gave up that hope after feeling faint while observing an operation. He seemed destined to become a revolutionary, supported by a devoted mother and basking early in the revolutionary recollections of his father. The elder Mazzini pushed his son to choose literature as a vocation but encountered the stubborn resistance of his wife. Giuseppe’s mother regarded her son as a messiah, fueling the mythical quality that came to surround him. She recounted that at age eleven, her son ran up to a beggar, threw his arms around him, and asked her to give him something. The beggar exclaimed, prophetically, "Love him dearly, signora. He is one who will love the people." All

-63-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Italy: From Revolution to Republic, 1700 to the Present
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 426

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.