Italy: From Revolution to Republic, 1700 to the Present

By Spencer M. Di Scala | Go to book overview

9
Cavour’s Heirs: The "Right" Reigns

On June 6, 1861, Camillo Cavour died at age fifty. Upon hearing of his death, Napoleon said: "The driver has fallen from the box; now we must see if the horses will bolt or go back to the stable."

This statement expressed Europe’s doubts that Italy would hold together. The "driver" had left at a crucial time. The peninsula had been united after centuries of political division, which had produced different customs, traditions, and dialects. Venice and Rome remained out of the kingdom, and making them part of Italy presented numerous diplomatic difficulties. Melding the disparate parts of the peninsula and building a single state out of long-divided areas would prove even more formidable. Risorgimento wars and the takeover of debts of the old states created enormous financial problems. Besides these issues, the question of whether the more socially backward parts of the peninsula could successfully transition to liberal institutions remained unresolved. Given the extent of the new kingdom’s tasks, the new state’s inability to become a great power hardly comes as a surprise.


Completing Unification

When Cavour died of "fever", the Kingdom of Italy had been declared, but unification remained incomplete. Cavour’s heirs (the "Right") had to integrate the peninsula into one state a qualitatively different and less heroic job than the exhilarating struggle for independence; as Victor Emmanuel II remarked, the age of poetry had given way to an age of prose.

European politics had determined the manner in which Italy had been unified and strongly influenced its future political development. The annexations excluded a federal structure, while the threat of political disputes leading to foreign intervention and collapse made calling a constituent assembly impossible. The different parts of the peninsula had been attached to a preexisting state that had its own dynasty, constitution, and administrative structure. It is hardly surpris

-121-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Italy: From Revolution to Republic, 1700 to the Present
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 426

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.