Latin Looks: Images of Latinas and Latinos in the U.S. Media

By Clara E. Rodríguez | Go to book overview

17
Questions and Reflections About the Reading in This Book
Clara E. RodríguezThe following questions provide readers with an opportunity to reflect on the ideas discussed by the authors and the relationship of these ideas to readers' own perspectives or to those of other writers. The questions, which are specific to the chapters in this volume, will help readers to summarize, mentally or in writing, the major ideas in each of the chapters. These questions emphasize critical thinking and will also help readers to read, respond, evaluate, and integrate the ideas presented. Using these questions as a guide, readers can articulate a coherent synthesis of the readings, while at the same time becoming more aware of their own values and perspectives.
Chapter 1. "Out of the Picture. Hispanics in the Media," by National Council of La Raza (NCLR)
1. Friedman ( 1991) and Wilson and Gutiérrez ( 1995:73ff) have documented that many minority groups have been misrepresented and underrepresented in the media. What makes the Latino situation as NCLR describes it unique?
2. What can be done to improve the lack of representation and the misrepresentation of Latinos in the media?

Chapter 2. "Hispanic Voices: Is the Press Listening?" by Jorge Quiroga
In the four case studies Quiroga discusses, how are the following points illustrated?
1. Press indifference toward Hispanics seems more the rule than the exception.
2. Reporters and editors habitually speak about Hispanics, not to Hispanics.
3. Newsrooms regularly present Hispanics as unable or unwilling to help or speak for themselves.
4. Hispanics are not quite completely ignored, but neither are they fully seen or counted.

-254-

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Latin Looks: Images of Latinas and Latinos in the U.S. Media
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Introduction 1
  • Notes 11
  • Part One - Latinos on Television and in the News: Absent or Misrepresented 13
  • Notes 19
  • 1: Out of the Picture 21
  • 2 - Hispanic Voices: is the Press Listening? 36
  • Notes 53
  • 3: Distorted Reality 57
  • Part Two - The Silver Screen: Stories and Stereotypes 73
  • Notes 79
  • 4: Visual Retrospective 80
  • 5: Citizen Chicano 85
  • 6 - Stereotyping in Films in General and of the Hispanic in Particular 104
  • References 119
  • 7 - Chicanas in Film: History of an Image 121
  • Notes 139
  • 8: From Assimilation to Annihilation 142
  • 9: West Side Story 164
  • 10: Keeping It Reel? Films of the 1980s and 1990s 180
  • Part Three - Creating Alternative Images: The Others" Present Themselves" 185
  • 11 - From the Margin to the Center: Puerto Rican Cinema in New York 188
  • Notes 199
  • 12: Unofficial Stories 200
  • 13: Type and Stereotype 214
  • 14 - Two Film Reviews: My Family/Mi Familia and the Perez Family 221
  • 15 - Hispanic-Oriented Media 225
  • Notes 236
  • References 236
  • Part Four - Strategies for Change 239
  • 16 - Promoting Analytical and Critical Viewing 240
  • Notes 247
  • Notes 250
  • Notes 253
  • 17 - Questions and Reflections About the Reading in This Book 254
  • 18: What We Can Do 261
  • References 271
  • About-The Book, and Editor 275
  • About the Contributors 277
  • Index 279
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