Latin Looks: Images of Latinas and Latinos in the U.S. Media

By Clara E. Rodríguez | Go to book overview

About the Contributors

The National Council of La Raza (NCLR) report was prepared by Lisa Navarrete with Charles Kamasaki. Based in Washington, D.C., and headed by Raul Yzaguirre, the NCLR is the largest constituency-based Hispanic organization in the United States; major areas of interest include policy analysis, advocacy, and legislation.

Jorge Quiroga is an award-winning senior news reporter for WCVB-TV in Boston. He was also the creator, first producer, and host of Aqui, a Hispanic public affairs program that first aired in 1974 on WCVB-TV.

S. Robert Lichter is the Founder of the Center for Media and Public Affairs; Daniel R. Amundson is its Research Director. The center is a nonpartisan and nonprofit research and educational organization that conducts scientific studies of news and entertainment media.

Chon Noriega is Assistant Professor in the University of California, Los Angeles, Department of Film and Television. He is the author of numerous works that examine ethnicity and the media.

Charles Ramírez Berg is Associate Professor in the Department of Radio-Television-Film at the University of Texas at Austin.

Carlos E. Cortés is Professor Emeritus of History in the Department of History at the University of California, Riverside.

Richie Pérez is currently Director of Community Development and Voter Participation at the Community Service Society in New York City. He is a former member of various activist organizations, including the Young Lords Party and the National Congress for Puerto Rican Rights, as well as a professor of Puerto Rican Studies.

Alberto Sandoval Sáachez is Professor of Spanish in the Department of Spanish and Italian at Mount Holyoke College.

Lillian Jiménez is Acting Executive Director of Media Network, a national media arts center. She has been active in the field of independent film and video for the past twenty years and launched the National Latino Film and Video Festival at El Museo del Barrio in 1981.

Liz Kotz has written on film, video, and visual arts for Artforum, Art in America, and other publications. A graduate student in comparative literature at Columbia University, she is completing a dissertation on the obsession with language in 1960s U.S. art.

Linda Williams is Professor of Film Studies and Womens Studies at the University of California, Irvine.

Santiago Nieves is a veteran print and broadcast journalist and media critic who in 1976 founded Latino Journal radio's longest-running Latino news and opinion program. He also still hosts and produces this program, as well as Talk Back on WBAI in New York.

Frank Algarin works for the Latino Collaborative, an independent film and video collaborative in New York.

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Latin Looks: Images of Latinas and Latinos in the U.S. Media
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Introduction 1
  • Notes 11
  • Part One - Latinos on Television and in the News: Absent or Misrepresented 13
  • Notes 19
  • 1: Out of the Picture 21
  • 2 - Hispanic Voices: is the Press Listening? 36
  • Notes 53
  • 3: Distorted Reality 57
  • Part Two - The Silver Screen: Stories and Stereotypes 73
  • Notes 79
  • 4: Visual Retrospective 80
  • 5: Citizen Chicano 85
  • 6 - Stereotyping in Films in General and of the Hispanic in Particular 104
  • References 119
  • 7 - Chicanas in Film: History of an Image 121
  • Notes 139
  • 8: From Assimilation to Annihilation 142
  • 9: West Side Story 164
  • 10: Keeping It Reel? Films of the 1980s and 1990s 180
  • Part Three - Creating Alternative Images: The Others" Present Themselves" 185
  • 11 - From the Margin to the Center: Puerto Rican Cinema in New York 188
  • Notes 199
  • 12: Unofficial Stories 200
  • 13: Type and Stereotype 214
  • 14 - Two Film Reviews: My Family/Mi Familia and the Perez Family 221
  • 15 - Hispanic-Oriented Media 225
  • Notes 236
  • References 236
  • Part Four - Strategies for Change 239
  • 16 - Promoting Analytical and Critical Viewing 240
  • Notes 247
  • Notes 250
  • Notes 253
  • 17 - Questions and Reflections About the Reading in This Book 254
  • 18: What We Can Do 261
  • References 271
  • About-The Book, and Editor 275
  • About the Contributors 277
  • Index 279
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