The Son of the Wolf: Tales of the Far North

By Jack London; Charles N. Watson | Go to book overview

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The standard bibliography of writings by and about London, now in need of updating, is Jack London: A Bibliography ( Georgetown, Calif., 1966; augmented Millwood, NY, 1973), by Hensley C. Woodbridge, John London, and George H. Tweney. Also useful are Dale L. Walker and James E. Sisson, III, The Fiction of Jack London: A Chronological Bibliography (El Paso, 1972), and Joan R. Sherman Jack London: A Reference Guide ( Boston, 1977). Although no collection of the complete works currently exists, a three-volume edition of The Complete Short Stories of Jack London ( Stanford, 1993) has been carefully edited by Earle Labor, Robert C. Leitz, III, and I. Milo Shepard. The same editors have produced the three-volume Letters of Jack London ( Stanford, 1988), an invaluable resource for the London student. Though each has its biases and limitations, the most useful biographies are Richard O'Connor Jack London: A Biography ( Boston, 1964), Andrew Sinclair Jack: A Biography of Jack London ( New York, 1977), Russ Kingman A Pictorial Life of Jack London ( New York, 1979), and Clarice Stasz American Dreamers: Charmian and Jack London ( New York, 1988). The Book of Jack London ( New York, 1921) is a worshipful two-volume life by the novelist's second wife, Charmian Kittredge London, which must be used with great caution but nevertheless contains important information and perspectives, as does Jack London and His Times (New York, 1939; repr. Seattle, 1968), by the novelist's daughter Joan London, who intermixes biography, personal recollection, and depiction of her father's milieu from a leftist perspective. Another early study of London's socialist writings is Philip S. Foner Jack London: American Rebel ( New York, 1947), and a more recent book on the same topic is Carolyn Johnston Jack London--An American Radical? (Westport, Conn., 1984). Further scholarly resources are Dale L. Walker Jack London: No Mentor But Myself (Port Washington, NY, 1979), a collection of letters, reviews, and essays on writing and writers; and David Mike Hamilton 'The Tools of My Trade': The Annotated Books in Jack London's Library ( Seattle, 1986).

Though necessarily brief, the best combination of biography and critical interpretation can be found in Earle Labor Jack London ( New York, 1974), now available in a revised edition ( New York, 1994) written with Jeanne Campbell Reesman. Essential to an understanding of the Northland writings in the context of the early

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