The Son of the Wolf: Tales of the Far North

By Jack London; Charles N. Watson | Go to book overview

IN A FAR COUNTRY

When a man journeys into a far country, he must be prepared to forget many of the things he has learned, and to acquire such customs as are inherent with existence in the new land; he must abandon the old ideals and the old gods, and oftentimes he must reverse the very codes by which his conduct has hitherto been shaped. To those who have the protean faculty of adaptability, the novelty of such change may even be a source of pleasure; but to those who happen to be hardened to the ruts in which they were created, the pressure of the altered environment is unbearable, and they chafe in body and in spirit under the new restrictions which they do not understand. This chafing is bound to act and react, producing divers evils and leading to various misfortunes. It were better for the man who cannot fit himself to the new groove to return to his own country; if he delay too long, he will surely die.

The man who turns his back upon the comforts of an elder civilization, to face the savage youth, the primordial simplicity of the North, may estimate success at an inverse ratio to the quantity and quality of his hopelessly fixed habits. He will soon discover, if he be a fit candidate, that the material habits are the less important. The exchange of such things as a dainty menu for rough fare, of the stiff leather shoe for the soft, shapeless moccasin, of the feather bed for a couch in the snow, is after all a very easy matter. But his pinch will come in learning properly to shape his mind's attitude toward all things, and especially toward his fellow man. For the courtesies of ordinary life, he must substitute unselfishness, forbearance, and tolerance. Thus, and thus only, can he gain that pearl of great price,--true comradeship. He must not say 'Thank you;' he must mean it without opening his mouth, and prove it by responding in kind. In short, he must substitute the deed for the word, the spirit for the letter.

When the world rang with the tale of Arctic gold, and the

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The Son of the Wolf: Tales of the Far North
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Oxford World's Classics the Son of the Wolf Tales of the Far North i
  • Oxford World's Classics ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction ix
  • Note on the Text xxvi
  • Select Bibliography xxviii
  • A Chronology of Jack London xxx
  • The Son of the Wolf Tales of the Far North 1
  • The White Silence 3
  • The Son of the Wolf 13
  • The Men of Forty-Mile 29
  • In a Far Country 38
  • To the Man on Trail 55
  • The Priestly Prerogative 64
  • The Wisdom of the Trail 78
  • The Wife of a King 86
  • An Odyssey of the North 102
  • Selected Northland Tales 135
  • Grit of Women 137
  • The Great Interrogation 151
  • The Law of Life 165
  • At the Rainbow's End 172
  • The Story of Jees Uck 182
  • The League of the Old Men 206
  • The Marriage of Lit-Lit 222
  • Love of Life 233
  • The White Man's Way 254
  • Finis 267
  • Like Argus of the Ancient Times 285
  • Explanatory Notes 313
  • A Selection of Oxford World's Classics 323
  • The Oxford World's Classics Website 333
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