The Son of the Wolf: Tales of the Far North

By Jack London; Charles N. Watson | Go to book overview

GRIT OF WOMEN

A wolfish head, wistful-eyed and frost-rimed, thrust aside the tent-flaps.

'Hi! Chook!* Siwash! Chook, you limb of Satan!' chorused the protesting inmates. Bettles rapped the dog sharply with a tin plate, and it withdrew hastily. Louis Savoy refastened the flaps, kicked a frying-pan over against the bottom, and warmed his hands. It was very cold without. Forty-eight hours gone, the spirit thermometer had burst at sixty-eight below, and since that time it had grown steadily and bitterly colder. There was no telling when the snap would end. And it is poor policy, unless the gods will it, to venture far from a stove at such times, or to increase the quantity of cold atmosphere one must breathe. Men sometimes do it, and sometimes they chill their lungs. This leads up to a dry, hacking cough, noticeably irritable when bacon is being fried. After that, somewhere along in the spring or summer, a hole is burned in the frozen muck. Into this a man's carcass is dumped, covered over with moss, and left with the assurance that it will rise on the crack of Doom, wholly and frigidly intact. For those of little faith, sceptical of material integration on that fateful day, no fitter country than the Klondike can be recommended to die in. But it is not to be inferred from this that it is a fit country for living purposes.

It was very cold without, but it was not over-warm within. The only article which might be designated furniture was the stove, and for this the men were frank in displaying their preference. Upon half of the floor pine boughs had been cast; above this were spread the sleeping-furs, beneath lay the winter's snowfall. The remainder of the floor was moccasin-packed snow, littered with pots and pans and the general impedimenta of an Arctic camp. The stove was red and roaring hot, but only a bare three feet away lay a block of ice, as sharp-edged and dry as when first quarried from the creek bottom. The pressure of the outside cold forced the inner

-137-

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The Son of the Wolf: Tales of the Far North
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Oxford World's Classics the Son of the Wolf Tales of the Far North i
  • Oxford World's Classics ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction ix
  • Note on the Text xxvi
  • Select Bibliography xxviii
  • A Chronology of Jack London xxx
  • The Son of the Wolf Tales of the Far North 1
  • The White Silence 3
  • The Son of the Wolf 13
  • The Men of Forty-Mile 29
  • In a Far Country 38
  • To the Man on Trail 55
  • The Priestly Prerogative 64
  • The Wisdom of the Trail 78
  • The Wife of a King 86
  • An Odyssey of the North 102
  • Selected Northland Tales 135
  • Grit of Women 137
  • The Great Interrogation 151
  • The Law of Life 165
  • At the Rainbow's End 172
  • The Story of Jees Uck 182
  • The League of the Old Men 206
  • The Marriage of Lit-Lit 222
  • Love of Life 233
  • The White Man's Way 254
  • Finis 267
  • Like Argus of the Ancient Times 285
  • Explanatory Notes 313
  • A Selection of Oxford World's Classics 323
  • The Oxford World's Classics Website 333
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