African American Women and the Vote, 1837-1965

By Ann D. Gordon; Bettye Collier-Thomas | Go to book overview

and their attainment transcended permanent party allegiances. Whether as a registered Republican, an occasional supporter of Democratic party candidates, or as a Progressive party stalwart, she did show the capability to evolve and to mature as a political activist as the circumstances and situations warranted. However, though her affiliation with political institutions changed and her commitment to the two-party system was fundamentally altered, Bass never wavered in her basic commitment as a journalist and political activist to help "shape the destiny of a community, a race and a nation." 38


Notes
1
"Address at the National Convention of the Progressive Party, Chicago, July 4, 1952", in Paul Robeson Speaks: Writings, Speeches, Interviews, 1918-1974, ed. Philip S. Foner ( Secaucus, N.J.: Citadel Press, 1978), 322-23.
2
Biographical information on the early, years of Charlota Bass is scarce. In her autobiography, Forty Years:Memoirs from the Pages of a Newspaper ( Los Angeles: Charlotta A. Bass, 1960), she does not give her date and place of birth and mentions in all-too-brief passing that she lived on the East Coast and migrated to California for health reasons. Her biographical entry in the 1928-29 edition of Who's Who in Colored America likewise contains no mention of date and place of birth but does mention that she was educated at Brown University, Pembroke Hall; Columbia University; and the University of California ( Joseph J. Boris, Who's Who in Colored America:A Biographical Dictionary of Notable Living Persons of African Descent in America, 1928-1929, 2d ed. [ New York: Who's Who in Colored America Corporation, 1929], 23). Her profile was not included in the editions for 1930-32, 1943-44, and 1950.

During her 1952 campaign for the vice-presidency, Bass indicated that she was born in Little Compton, Rhode Island, and was sixty-two years old. Federal Bureau of Investigation reports on Bass, maintained from 1944 until her death in 1969, cited the records of the registrar of voters for the city of Los Angeles, which indicated that she was approximately ten to twelve years older than she professed. However, FBI agents were never able to ascertain her place of birth as the Rhode Island Public Health Department had "no birth data" concerning Bass (FBI Reports, 5 April 1944, 100-20874, 21 May 1953, 100- 20874; reports in author's possession). Her obituary in the Los Angeles Sentinel, 17 April 1969, gave only fleeting reference to a Rhode Island place of birth and gave her age at death as ninety-four, suggesting an 1874 or 1875 date of birth. In their profile of Bass, Andrew Buni and Carol Hurd Green write that Bass was born in Sumter, South Carolina, and suggest an October 1880 birth date; although they write that Bass moved to Rhode Island before 1900, they provide no more information about her schooling ( Notable American Women:The Modern Period, s.v. "Bass").

3
See the biographies of Bethune, Terrell, Lampkin, Haynes, and Gaines in Notable American Women:The Modern Period.
4
Delilah L. Beasley, The Negro Trailblazers of California ( 1919; rpt., New York: Negro Universities Press, 1969), chap. 18.

-169-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
African American Women and the Vote, 1837-1965
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 217

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.