Legacy of Suppression: Freedom of Speech and Press in Early American History

By Leonard Williams Levy | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

It is a pleasure to acknowledge the encouragement that I have received from Justice Felix Frankfurter, Professor Henry Steele Commager of Amherst College, Professor Richard B. Morris of Columbia University, Mr. Howard Jay Graham of the Los Angeles County Law Library, Mr. Henry Allen Moe of the Guggenheim Foundation, Professors Mark Howe and Paul Freund of Harvard Law School, and my colleagues, Professors Max Lerner and John P. Roche of Brandeis University. Professors Freund and Roche, who read this manuscript in entirety, offered suggestions that helped to correct errors of fact and judgment. Professor Roche, by his conversation and writings, contributed much to my own thinking. But my deepest obligation, by far, is to Professor Howe. He gave selfless hours of patient, oral criticism and Socratic questioning which he supplemented with detailed notes on revision that proved to be invaluable. I deeply appreciate his counsel, criticism, and confidence. That I sometimes have not concurred in the judgments of those for whom I have the very highest regard does not lessen my sense of debt to them nor diminish the value of their advice.

I am very grateful to the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation for the fellowship that enabled me to take a year's leave of absence from Brandeis University. The Fund for the Republic also provided aid. Abram L.

-xiii-

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