Effects of the War on Money, Credit and Banking in France and the United States

By Benjamin M. Anderson | Go to book overview

CHAPTER IV
Depression and "Réprise des Affaires"

In tracing the history of money, credit and banking in France during the war, we shall give attention to certain large topics, some of which can be treated with considerable detail. Among these are the following: (1) The economic depression that followed the outbreak of the war and the gradual resumption of industrial and commercial activity to which the French have given the name "réprise des affaires." (2) The disturbances in the technique of industry, particularly in the matter of raw materials, labor force and coal, and in transportation, both by land and sea, which have grown out of the war. (3) The moratorium and the efforts to get rid of it. (4) The course of security prices on the French bourse and the main causes affecting them. (5) The rôle of the Banque de France during the war, including an account of its relations with the state, its aid to industry and commerce, its relations with other banks, its gold policy and the main changes in its balance sheet. (6) The effects of the war on the great private banks, the provincial banks and the savings banks. (7) Public finance, with special reference to taxes and public loans, and the reaction of public finance on banking and foreign exchange. (8) The foreign trade of France and the problem of foreign exchange rates and international payments. (9) The changes in the circulating medium in France: the disappearance of gold and silver coin, hoarding, substitutes for coin, the efforts to popularize the use of checks, the extension of the clearing house system. (10) The course of commodity prices in France and the main causes affecting them.

These topics are all interrelated and the order of treatment is more or less a matter of arbitrary choice. It will be convenient, however, to sketch certain general features in large outline before undertaking a detailed treatment of any of them.

-56-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Effects of the War on Money, Credit and Banking in France and the United States
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 227

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.