Effects of the War on Money, Credit and Banking in France and the United States

By Benjamin M. Anderson | Go to book overview

INDEX
Acceptances—seeBills of exchange.
Aldrich -Vreeland Act, 10, 150, 151, 165.
Allies, The: increase in American exports, 4; adverse balance of trade, 11; increasing shipments of goods from United States, 12; loans by United States, 180.
American National Monetary Commission, 37, 53.
Austin, O. P., 159.
Austria: national banks, 10.
Bank credits: efforts to convert to gold, 5; Germany, France and Russia, 6; contraction, 11; expansion, 12, 13; France, 28, 32, 109-110. 126: transfers without use of checks, 30; German " giro system," 30; in time of panic, 52-54; increase, France, 68; United States, 179; expansion, 182-195; Treasury certificates of indebtedness, 182, 183; loans on liberty bonds, 183; loans to tax payers, 183; effect on prices, 184; necessity for expansion during transition periods, 184- 185; effect of loan policy of United States, 185; control over extensions, 172- 174, 190-194; subcommittee on money rates of New York liberty loan committee organized, 194. See alsoCredit.
Bank notes: usage in England, France and America, 29; velocity of circulation, France, 31; hoarding, in France, 45, 78, 85, 110; depreciation of French, 79, 83, 84, 85; comparison between bank note issue and deposit and check system, 89- 90; issue of Banque de France, 110, 112; raising legal limit of issue, table, 111; issue of Banque de' I'Algérie, 111; of federal reserve bank notes, 163; federal reserve notes as legal reserve, 169. See alsoCurrency; Money; Paper money.
Bank of England: depository at Ottawa, 12; discounted heavily for London banks, 1914, 53; all lawful demands for gold paid, 106; gold reserve policy, 174, 175; agency for federal reserve banks, 178; gold in vault, bank notes in circulation, etc., since outbreak of the war, chart, 215.
Bank of France—seeBanque de France.
Banking systems: lack of French statistical material, 19; character and operation of French banks, 19-23; contrast between French and American, 19, 24-25, 27, 29, 31, 34, 53-54; French terms explained, 20-23; centralization in France, 24-26; evils accentuated by centralization. 39; marketing operations of private banks, 36; testimony of officers of Créit Lyonnais as to marketing operations, 37; deposit and current account banking. 27, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34; in America, 33, 34; branch banking in Canada, France, etc., 40; investments, loans, etc., banks of various countries, 40-42; French system, 43; United States federal reserve system, 165-178.
Banks: efforts to increase gold reserve, 6; central, suspend gold redemption 6; protected by closing of stock exchanges, 8-9; central, aid in meeting collapse of credit system, 9; issue of emergency currency, 10-11; character of French banks, 19, 27, 28; resemble American bond houses, 37- 38; investment of funds, 38-40; manufacturing enterprises financed by German, 40, 41; assets of German banks not liquid, 41; French, heavy lenders to German banks until 1911, 41-42; runs on French banks, 44; shares decrease in value on French exchange, 45; recovery in shares of Banque de France, 48; great credit houses of France, 45, 49, 52; assets not liquid, 50; American, in times of panic, 53; London joint stock banks curtail loans, 53; clearing house certificates in time of panic, 54; Banque de France, 105-113; banks in France, 114-121; difficulties due to moratorium, 54, 55, 122, 124, 126, banks of France supporting American loan, 137; United States, drains on cash reserves in July, 1914, 150; clearing house certificates, 150; United States, legal reserve, 169; State, response to President's appeal to join federal reserve system, 177; resources, 1914-1918, 185, See alsoPrivate banks; Savings banks.
Banque de France: note issue, 10, 22, 24, 27, 112; legal limit increased, 51, 111; table, 1915-1918,111; issue expanded to meet emergencies, 109, 110; value of notes, 107; amount in circulation. 108; Chamber of Commerce notes secured by notes of, 88: credits. 11, 13, 28, 30, 22, 33; plans for relief of Parquet, 123; steady rise in shares from 1915, 127; chart, 128; the great central bank, France, 24; gold reserve, 24, 35, 107- 108, 143; assets limited to liquid items, 42; stops runs on Société Générale by statement of bank's status, 44; initial burden of war on, 45; selected items from balance sheets, 1914-1918, table, 113; suspension of specie payments, 50; rediscounting for private banks, 52, 54, 111, 126, decline in moratorium bills and gain in new bills, 67-68; advantage taken of moratorium, 85; receives hoarded gold for Treasury notes. 86: advances to the government, 70, 100, 101, 108, 109, 112; redemption of notes, 79; silver reserve, 83; silver affected as legal tender by suspension of gold payments, 84; gold supply protected, 87; attitude toward use of checks, 90, 91; clearing operations, 91: heroic rôle during the war, 105; gold policy, 105-107; methods to reduce State's debt, 109; current accounts ex

-221-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Effects of the War on Money, Credit and Banking in France and the United States
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 227

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.