Elsie Clews Parsons: Inventing Modern Life

By Desley Deacon | Go to book overview

BIBLIOGRAPHY OF ELSIE CLEWS PARSONS, 1896-1961
The following list is chronological within years and includes selected unpublished works.
1896 [ Elsie W. Clews.) "The History of the Monroe Doctrine from 1822 to 1861: A Study on Public Opinion." Manuscript. American Philosophical Society Library.
1897 [ Elsie W. Clews.] "On Certain Phases of Poor-Relief in the City of New York." M.A. thesis, Columbia University.
1898 [ Elsie W. Clews.] "The Status of the Study of Pedagogics in the American College and University." Journal of Pedagogy 11 (Jan.): 51-60.
1899 [ Elsie W. Clews.] Educational Legislation and Administration of the Colonial Governments. Columbia University Contributions to Philosophy, Psychology, and Education 6. New York: Macmillan. Reprint, New York: Arno Press, 1971.
1900 [ Elsie W. Clews.] "Field Work in Teaching Sociology." Educational Review 19 (Sept.): 159-69.
1903 Trans. The Laws of Imitation, by Gabriel Tarde, with an introduction by Franklin H. Giddings. New York: Henry Holt and Company. Translated from Les Lois de l'imitation, 2d ed. ( Paris, 1895).
1904-7 "Little Essays in Lifting Taboo." Manuscript. American Philosophical Society Library.
"The Aim of Productive Efficiency in Education."
"Caste and the Unproductive Activities of the American Woman."
"A Compromise Plan for Girls with Nothing to Do."
"A Failure in Democracy." [On marriage.]
"The Injured Party?" [On illegitimacy.]
"Lax or Brittle Marriage?"
"Literary Censorship for Boys and Girls."
"On Sending a Daughter, Willy Nilly, to College."
"On the Domestic Service Problem."
"Penalizing Marriage and Child Bearing."
"A Plea against Nursery Paraphrases."
"Pertinent to the Simple Life."
"Some Anonymous Causes of Divorce."
"Some Inconsistencies of Home Education." [On sex roles.]
"The Taboo of Direct Reference."

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