Introduction I: Nature and Abstraction

Picasso's biographers have often voiced the opinion (occasionally endorsed by Picasso himself) that his art shows no development. Such a statement about an artist usually implies that he does not change. In the case of Picasso something entirely different is implied, namely, that no meaningful connection derivable from a personal core can be found between his extraordinarily different "periods." It seems as though by some inexplicable miracle he has combined many artists in a single person; and the inference is drawn that this person is not a unified personality. There is a good deal of evidence, however, that Picasso the man is a strong, well-defined personality whose manifestations on the most varied occasions are remarkably consistent. We must therefore conclude that we are still too close to Picasso to discern the unity of his art. The same is perhaps true of the development of his art, though here we may point out even today that his work of the last fifteen years is in many respects a synthesis of that of the earlier periods. The extremely varied character of Picasso's art, which baffles some critics, is regarded by many others as evidence of his unique genius and his ability to play all the instruments of his time with equal virtuosity. But neither the naturalistic nor the so-called abstract school —to take only the extremes—can lay claim to Picasso: even when he seems to observe the standards of nature he is by no means without other intentions, and even when he is non-objective he is not apt to lose sight of nature completely.

Any artist's relation to nature is of basic importance; Picasso's cannot be reduced to any well-trodden formula. He does not paint "from" nature, in the naturalistic sense; nor does he create "like" nature, as the non-objective artists claim to do. He himself has said on occasion that he works "with" nature—meaning no doubt that his relation to it is personal, not objective. Nature has always been for him an inexhaustible source of inspiration; and "nature" stands here for environment in the broadest possible sense. It is not merely the optical appearance of things that fascinates and stimulates him, but the sum total of their properties graspable through form—something that might be called their "essence." For Picasso, art is a means of securing for him

"Documents" page 504

-71-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Picasso
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 2
  • Contents 5
  • Preface 7
  • Thoughts About Picasso 9
  • Introduction I: Nature and Abstraction 71
  • Introduction Ii: Range of Styles 95
  • Early Years in Barcelona and Paris 109
  • The Blue Period 120
  • The Rose Period 131
  • Origins of Cubism 141
  • Evolution of Cubism 165
  • Classical Interlude 175
  • Picasso and Surrealism 193
  • Symbolic Themes 206
  • Guernica 225
  • Portraits and Landscapes 240
  • Antibes 262
  • Vallauris: Ceramics 278
  • Sculpture 285
  • Ornament and Image. War and Peace 295
  • Notes and References 350
  • Classified Catalogue 453
  • Bibliograpby 516
  • Index of Names 523
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 524

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.