Introduction II: Range of Styles

Modern man has access to the art treasures of the past in an "imaginary museum," and the twentieth-century artist has the most varied, indeed, the most contrasting stylistic means at his disposal. Unlike the old masters whose formal language—for all their—artistic freedom in regard to details—was the end product of various religious, social, and local traditions, and whose choice of means was largely predetermined, the modern painter has almost unlimited possibilities of choice. Weak natures are for that reason exposed to the great danger of learning numerous skills without truly mastering any of them. On the other hand, artists of the rank of Picasso, who change everything they touch into gold, are enabled to achieve greater scope and mastery than any artist of the past. As we shall see, Picasso has always made abundant use of all historical styles: he has often sought inspiration in the treasures of the past, motivated by an inner need of which he is frequently unaware. Otherwise he could not so easily have assimilated the accomplishments of others. To be sure, his own inventions in the realm of form far exceed his borrowings. But like all inventions, these were not created out of nothing. Whatever he discovered had always existed before him; but one had to have eyes to see it, and of course also the necessary imagination to improve it.

Picasso's virtuosity in the simultaneous use of completely different stylistic means is part of the essence of his art. The value of any of his works does not depend on its style: what matters is the experience captured in it. In each instance the artistic form is dictated by an actual experience, a contact with the outside world. In this chapter we shall illustrate Picasso's great range of stylistic means and his complete mastery of them by a comparative study of some of his works, beginning with still life compositions.

The oblong chalk drawing of 1919, reproduced on page 78, shows a pitcher, a dish of apples, and next to the bowl a single fruit on a table surface against a neutral background. At first glance the stylistic ideal embodied here appears to be one of extreme plasticity. The violent contrasts between light and shadow serve primarily to model the vessels and the apples. Particularly the squat form of the pitcher and the

-95-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Picasso
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 2
  • Contents 5
  • Preface 7
  • Thoughts About Picasso 9
  • Introduction I: Nature and Abstraction 71
  • Introduction Ii: Range of Styles 95
  • Early Years in Barcelona and Paris 109
  • The Blue Period 120
  • The Rose Period 131
  • Origins of Cubism 141
  • Evolution of Cubism 165
  • Classical Interlude 175
  • Picasso and Surrealism 193
  • Symbolic Themes 206
  • Guernica 225
  • Portraits and Landscapes 240
  • Antibes 262
  • Vallauris: Ceramics 278
  • Sculpture 285
  • Ornament and Image. War and Peace 295
  • Notes and References 350
  • Classified Catalogue 453
  • Bibliograpby 516
  • Index of Names 523
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 524

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.