Permanence and Change: An Anatomy of Purpose

By Kenneth Burke | Go to book overview

jectionable not because it is directly counter to the poetic, but because it leaves too much out of account. It shows us merely those aspects of experience which can be phrased within its terms. It is truncated, as the poetic metaphor, buttressed by the concept of recalcitrance, is not.


CONCLUSIONS

IN THE course of our three sections we have attempted to show an integral relationship existing among a great variety of cultural manifestations which are often considered in isolation. We have tried to handle conjunctly much that is usually considered disjunctly. We have tried to suggest in what way an orientation, or Weltanschauung, tends to become a self-perpetuating structure, creating the measures by which it shall be measured. It moves to form a closed circle, though individual or class divergencies ever tend to break the regularity of this circle. Essentially, however, we aimed to show that the circle is basically ethical. In the simplest summary, let us say that we have been attempting to consider the many ramifications implicit in the statement that "our thoughts and acts are affected by our interests."

To this end we sought to trace the tie-up among many manifestations of the ethical or creative impulse, which we here list more or less at random:

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Permanence and Change: An Anatomy of Purpose
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Permanence and Change - An Anatomy of Purpose *
  • Contents 7
  • Part I- On Interpretation 11
  • I- Orientation 11
  • II- Motives 30
  • III- Occupational Psychosis 54
  • IV- Style 71
  • V- Magic, Religion, and Science 82
  • Part II- Perspective by Incongruity 95
  • I- The Range of Piety 95
  • II- New Meanings 106
  • III- Perspective as Metaphor 118
  • IV- Argument by Analogy 128
  • V- Secular Conversions 164
  • VI- Meaning and Regression 193
  • Conclusion 207
  • Part III- The Basis of Simplification 214
  • I- Causality and Communication 214
  • II- Permanence and Change 227
  • III- Secular Mysticism in Bentham 237
  • IV- The Ethical Confusion 247
  • V- The Search for Motives 275
  • VI- Occupation and Preoccupation 303
  • VII- The Poetry of Action 316
  • Conclusions 336
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