Kentucky: A Guide to the Bluegrass State

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Preface

A commonwealth, in its most vital aspects, expresses itself through its people, whose characteristics distinguish but do not separate them from their neighbors. The differences need not necessarily be ethnic, but it is likely that speech and customs and points of view may be traced to an ancestry, itself marked and enduring. This is evidently the case with the people of Kentucky. It is not by idle chance that they admit with pride, sometimes with arrogance, that they are not the same as those who face them on the northern side of the Ohio River.

It follows that a guidebook to Kentucky should be something more than pages devoted to its natural wonders, climate, products, and history. It should seek to catch that spirit, indefinable but very real, which has transformed Stephen Foster's "My Old Kentucky Home" into something like a national ballad, poignant and tender, with personal appeal for Kentuckians. To retain that atmosphere, to make the Kentuckian, his land, and his background more understandable to those outside the State, has been one endeavor in the present volume. Another, and perhaps more useful purpose, has been to tell the Kentuckian himself of the natural resources that are his heritage, to invite him to take stock, as it were, of the opportunities which lie at his door.

But the State is well worth the attention of the visitor who travels to enjoy and to learn. It is primarily rural, and its one large city, Louisville, lies on the northern boundary. It has its "rocks and rills" of surpassing beauty, the remains of an untamed wilderness. It is for this reason most of all that this book, like its forty-seven companions, includes numerous meticulously detailed tours through the State, carefully traveled and checked for accuracy. This section of the Guide should be helpful to visitors and instructive for stay-at-homes.

The research and the industry which have gone into this work, cannot be too gratefully acknowledged. The book is submitted with modesty, and also with intimate satisfaction in the co-operation without which it could never have been completed.

Specialists, many of whom volunteered their services, read and criticized all copy prepared by the editorial staff; in some cases they pre

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