Kentucky: A Guide to the Bluegrass State

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ASHLAND

Railroad Stations: Carter Ave. and 12th St., for Chesapeake & Ohio Ry.; N. end Interstate Bridge, for Norfolk & Western R.R.; Kenova, W. Va. 6 m. E. for Baltimore & Ohio, and Norfolk & Western R.R's. Bus Station: Union Depot, 13th St., near Winchester Ave., for Greyhound and Sparks Bros. Lines. Local Buses: Local, interurban, and jitney buses; fare and 10¢. Airport: L. from Winchester Ave. on 34th St.; no scheduled service. Taxis: 250 minimum. Toll Bridge: Kentucky-Ohio Interstate Bridge: autos, 25¢; pedestrians, 5¢. Traffic Regulations: No U-turns or left-turns on business street intersections. Accommodations: Two hotels; rooming houses and private homes cater to tourists. Information Service: Eastern Kentucky Auto Assn., Henry Clay Hotel. Radio Station: WCMI (1310 kc.). Motion Picture Houses: Four. Swimming: South Side Pool, off Blackburn Ave., E., 10¢ and 25¢. Golf: Hillendale Club, Division St.; 18 holes, greens fee 50¢ and $1.

ASHLAND (555 alt., 29,074 pop.), largest and most important city in Eastern Kentucky, is concentrated on a rather high and wide flood plain of the Ohio River. The river makes a great bend around the southernmost tip of Ohio, receives the waters of the Big Sandy at the border between West Virginia and Kentucky, and then sweeps northwest with slow, easy curves past the long waterfront of Ashland. The city stretches up the river to Catlettsburg at the mouth of the Big Sandy, and down to the rolling mill plant, a distance of seven miles, widening and narrowing with the contour of the river bluffs overlooking the town:

Ashland is the chief Kentucky unit of an industrial area that includes Huntington, Ceredo, and Kenova, West Virginia; and Coalgrove, Ironton, and Portsmouth, Ohio. The river bank at Ashland is uncommonly high, acting as a wall against all but the superfloods that ravage most river towns year after year. This protected river front is, however, strictly utilitarian. Along it are strung the steel and iron mills, the sawmills, the coke plants, and brickyards. In front of the city fleets of barges pass, pushed by stern-wheeled tugboats, carrying thousands of tons of freight -- far more than in the heyday of river boats. In the decade before the turn of the century the Ohio River peak was 12 million tons, whereas in 1936 it was in excess of 24 millions of tons. The Gordon Greene, last of the packets making the run up-river to Pittsburgh, periodically sweeps by with the old grace.

Down near the river front, too, are many of the warehouses, wholesale houses, packing houses, the livestock market, and a few of the retail stores. But this part of the city is caught by high floods, and

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