Kentucky: A Guide to the Bluegrass State

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Left from the saddle of the gap on a trail that leads to SOLDIERS' CAVE (permission to visit obtained at L.m.U., at Harrogate, Tenn., 2 m. S. of Cumberland Gap), 0.5 m., now owned by Lincoln Memorial University. Soldiers' Cave, said to have been discovered by Confederate soldiers while digging a rifle pit, has war reminiscences cut on the walls and into the stones.

KING SOLOMON'S CAVE (permission to visit obtained at L.m.U.), 3 m., has a series of apartments or smaller caves that follow the contour of the mountain in a horizontal direction. Within, a river rushes over a cataract 20 to 30 feet high.

Among the many smaller caves in this section are LEWIS CAVE, WELL HOLE, and SALTPETER CAVE where early inhabitants obtained saltpeter for making gunpowder.

At 54.4 m. US 25E crosses the Tennessee Line, 14 miles north of Tazewell, Tenn. (see Tenn. Tour 3).


Tour 4B

Corbin -- Cumberland Falls State Park -- Parker's Lake; 30.2 m. State 90.

Hard-surfaced roadbed.

Good accommodations at Cumberland Falls State Park.

State 90 branches west from US 25 (see Tour 4) at CORBIN, 0 m., (1,046 alt., 8,026 pop.) (see Tour 4), and passes through a primitive sparsely settled region of great natural beauty. The road, winding over low hills, offers far-reaching views of purple and blue-green mountains and short fertile valleys.

From LOOKOUT POINT (R), 15.6 m., an elevation surrounded by walls of natural stone, is a wide view of row upon row of distant blue peaks and deep, thickly wooded gorges.

CUMBERLAND FALLS STATE PARK, 18.6 m. (open May 15 Oct. 1; adm. 100; hotel accommodations, $1.50 and up; furnished cabins, $1 a day; overnight camping 250,: bathhouses, picnic facilities).

This park, covering 500 acres of virgin forest, was the gift in 1930 of T. Coleman dupont, a Kentuckian. It is rough mountainous country cut by the Cumberland River, which threads its way over a rocky course, through the rugged hills.

CUMBERLAND FALLS, 68 feet high and 125 feet broad, has an average flow of 3,600 cubic feet of water a second. Immediately behind the falling sheet of water is a recess in the rock wall, which makes it possible to go almost across the river through the arch formed on one side by the rock and on the other by the flashing waters. Below the falls are many whirlpools and rapids in the river as it flows for seven miles through a boulder-strewn gorge, whose cliffs are 300 to 400 feet high.

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