Kentucky: A Guide to the Bluegrass State

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1826 the Whigs came into power and, resenting the tribute to their opponent, changed the name to Jamestown, honoring James Wooldridge who had donated 110 acres for a town site. Along Water and Main Sts. in Jamestown are numerous old clapboarded log houses. Outstanding among these are the J. R. McFARLAND HOUSE and the OTHA WELLS HOUSE, the oldest structures in the town. An annual community singing contest is held in the courthouse on the last Sunday in August.
1. Right from Jamestown on the Greasy Creek Rd., unimproved, to the GREASY CREEK WOOLEN MILL, 1 m., an old water-power mill that manufactures cloth and knitting yarns. Many farmers bring their fleeces to be processed here, paying for the work with a part of the raw wool. Near by is the KARNES GRISTMILL, one of four in operation in the county. The mills here were established before the War between the States.
2. Left from Jamestown on the Somerset Rd., unimproved, to INDIAN CAVE, 3 m., in a bluff 75 feet high. Its entrance pierces the mountain side to a depth of about 20 feet in a straight line and then continues in a meandering path for more than 300 feet. Several large chambers branch from the main passageway. A stream near the cave pours into the Narrows, a gorge that is only two feet wide at some points. Near by is the SHINBONE, a peculiarly shaped hill that is about 100 feet high and averages 30 feet in width at its base. Its rocky sides are covered with low-growing bushes. Big and Little Lily Creeks meet about 300 yards above the Narrows through which Lily Creek cascades to the Shinbone, which it encircles.

South of Jamestown the route continues through a hilly region, crossing Cumberland River by way of a free ferry.

The name of SEVENTY-SIX FALLS (L), 178.1 m., indicates the number of feet down which Indian Creek drops perpendicularly. Near the basin into which the creek plunges it sinks into the earth but emerges again after a subterranean flow of about one-half mile, only to fall another 10 feet into a watermill pond, the dam of which adds an additional 15-foot drop.

The route passes SEWELL MOUNTAIN (1,720 alt.), a spur (L) of the Cumberland Mountains.

ALBANY, 181.9 m. (964 alt., 852 pop.) (see Tour 20), is at the junction with State 90 (see Tour 20).

South of Albany JENNY'S KNOB (L) is visible for miles along the highway.

State 35 crosses the Tennessee Line, 187.7 m.


Tour 6

( Indianapolis, Ind.) -- Louisville -- Bardstown -- Hodgenville -- Glasgow -- Scottsville -- ( Nashville, Tenn.); US 31E.

Indiana Line to Tennessee Line, 147.8 m.

-288-

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Kentucky: A Guide to the Bluegrass State
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