Kentucky: A Guide to the Bluegrass State

By Federal Writers' Project | Go to book overview

chrysanthemums, peonies, and asters -- white, gold, pale yellow, and pink. Many of the rare bush-like helectite formations, as yet of undetermined origin, ornament small alcoves on each side of a passage more than a mile long. GRAND CANYON AVENUE, an imposing chamber 200 feet high, 110 feet wide, and 700 feet long, contains the tomb of Floyd Collins, who lost his life in 1925 in an effort to discover a new entrance to Crystal Cave from the highway at Sand Cave. During the period when searchers were frantically trying to find the lost man, the whole Nation waited for daily reports.


Tour 8

( Evansville, Ind.) -- Henderson -- Madisonville -- Hopkinsville -- Guthrie -- ( Nashville, Tenn.); US 41 and 41E, Dixie B-Line.

Indiana Line to Tennessee Line, 114.5 m.

Hard-surfaced roadbed throughout.

Louisville & Nashville R.R. roughly parallels US 41 throughout.

All types of accommodations in larger towns; limited elsewhere.

This route follows an old Indian trail that ran between the Great Lakes and the Gulf of Mexico. It was first made by the great herds of buffalo in their seasonal migrations from South to North and back again. Their trails, always following the least difficult routes, have become main roads throughout the State. Meriwether Lewis, while Governor of Upper Louisiana Territory, once had occasion to traverse this trace and recorded that he and his companions were so engrossed with its rugged beauty as to relax from their eternal lookout for lurking Shawnee and Wyandotte.

Between Henderson and Nashville this route was long a post road, called the Buttermilk Road, because farmers along the route set aside crocks of buttermilk and dippers, from which travelers might freely drink.

In Kentucky, US 41 passes throughout the entire Pennyrile, a region whose name was derived from pennyroyal, a herb of the mint family. The Pennyrile has rather vague boundaries but extends from the low wooded hills of the Ohio River on the north to the rich coal fields of southwestern Kentucky, a pastoral land cut through by deep winding streams.

US 41 crosses the Indiana Line, 0 m., 2 miles south of Evansville, Ind. (see Ind. Tour 16).

DADE PARK (L), 1 m., was built by James Ellis in 1922, on the part of Henderson County that was cut off on the north when the Ohio River changed its course. Races are held here for a period of 28 days, usually in August.

The highway crosses the Ohio River on the Henderson-Evansville (Audubon Highway) Bridge, 2 m. (toll 30¢).

-315-

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Kentucky: A Guide to the Bluegrass State
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword vii
  • Preface ix
  • Contents xi
  • List of Illustrations xv
  • List of Maps xxi
  • General Information xxiii
  • Calendar of Events xxvii
  • Part I - Kentucky: the General Background 1
  • Kentuckians 3
  • Natural Setting 7
  • Archeology and Indians 28
  • History 35
  • Agriculture 50
  • Transportation 56
  • Manufacturing and Mining 60
  • Labor 66
  • The Negro 72
  • Religion 77
  • Education 83
  • Folklore and Folk Music 89
  • Kentucky Thorough- Breds 94
  • Press and Radio 102
  • The Arts 110
  • Part II - Cities and Towns 137
  • Ashland 139
  • Covington 147
  • Frankfort 157
  • Harrodsburg 168
  • Louisville 175
  • Lexington 197
  • Paducah 221
  • Part III - Highways and Byways 231
  • Tour 1 233
  • Tour 2 242
  • Tour 3 246
  • Tour 4 261
  • Tour 4a 274
  • Tour 4b 279
  • Tour 5 280
  • Tour 6 288
  • Tour 7 296
  • Tour 7a 309
  • Tour 8 315
  • Tour 9 322
  • Tour 10 324
  • Tour 11 329
  • Tour 12 334
  • Tour 12a 341
  • Tour 13 344
  • Tour 14 351
  • Tour 15 362
  • Tour 16 387
  • Tour 17 414
  • Tour 17 A 419
  • Tour 18 424
  • Tour 19 433
  • Tour 20 441
  • Part IV - Appendices 449
  • Chronology 451
  • Selective Bibliography 462
  • Index 471
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