Kentucky: A Guide to the Bluegrass State

By Federal Writers' Project | Go to book overview

Tour 9

(Metropolis, Ill.) -- Paducah -- Mayfield -- Fulton -- (Martin, Tenn.); US 45. Illinois Line to Tennessee Line, 53.4 m.

Hard-surfaced roadbed.

Illinois Central R.R. parallels route throughout.

All types of accommodations in towns, limited elsewhere.

This route crosses the western section of the State, which is called the Jackson Purchase because the United States, on October 19, 1818, through its commissioners, Gen. Andrew Jackson and Gov. Isaac Shelby, purchased from the Chickasaw Indians, for the sum of $300,000, 8,500 square miles of desolate wilderness, west of the Tennessee River. Today that territory comprises eight counties in the westernmost section of Kentucky and 20 counties in Tennessee, and is among the most fertile sections in both of these States. The surface of the region is gently undulating with a few ridges along the highway. The area yields such a quantity of fruits and vegetables that huge trucks loaded with strawberries, dewberries, apples, peaches, and tomatoes, lumber over the highways day and night during the growing season. Tobacco and corn are also raised in quantities and, in the southernmost section, cotton is grown. In the southwestern part are still many fine stands of poplar, hickory, and oak. Near the Tennessee Line trees and shrubs border the road.

US 45 crosses the Illinois Line, 0 m., 13 miles southeast of Metropolis, Ill. (see Ill. Tour 3), on the Brookport-Paducah Bridge (toll 50¢) over the Ohio River.

PADUCAH, 4.5 m. (341 alt., 33,541 pop.) (see Paducah).

Points of Interest: Paduke Statue, Tilghman Memorial, Irvin Cobb Hotel, McCracken County Courthouse, Nobel Park, and others.

Paducah is at the junction with US 60 (see Tour 16), US 62 (see Tour 14), and US 68 (see Tour 15).

MAYFIELD, 30 m. (421 alt., 8,177 pop.), seat of Graves County, like many other Southern cities, is built around the courthouse which is in the center of a block known as Court Square.

A man named Mayfield, according to local legend, journeyed from Mississippi to Mills Point (now Hickman) in 1817 to attend the races. There he was captured by a band of ruffians who carried him to the banks of a near-by creek to rob him. After carving his name on a tree near the stream, Mayfield attempted to escape by crossing the creek

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Kentucky: A Guide to the Bluegrass State
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword vii
  • Preface ix
  • Contents xi
  • List of Illustrations xv
  • List of Maps xxi
  • General Information xxiii
  • Calendar of Events xxvii
  • Part I - Kentucky: the General Background 1
  • Kentuckians 3
  • Natural Setting 7
  • Archeology and Indians 28
  • History 35
  • Agriculture 50
  • Transportation 56
  • Manufacturing and Mining 60
  • Labor 66
  • The Negro 72
  • Religion 77
  • Education 83
  • Folklore and Folk Music 89
  • Kentucky Thorough- Breds 94
  • Press and Radio 102
  • The Arts 110
  • Part II - Cities and Towns 137
  • Ashland 139
  • Covington 147
  • Frankfort 157
  • Harrodsburg 168
  • Louisville 175
  • Lexington 197
  • Paducah 221
  • Part III - Highways and Byways 231
  • Tour 1 233
  • Tour 2 242
  • Tour 3 246
  • Tour 4 261
  • Tour 4a 274
  • Tour 4b 279
  • Tour 5 280
  • Tour 6 288
  • Tour 7 296
  • Tour 7a 309
  • Tour 8 315
  • Tour 9 322
  • Tour 10 324
  • Tour 11 329
  • Tour 12 334
  • Tour 12a 341
  • Tour 13 344
  • Tour 14 351
  • Tour 15 362
  • Tour 16 387
  • Tour 17 414
  • Tour 17 A 419
  • Tour 18 424
  • Tour 19 433
  • Tour 20 441
  • Part IV - Appendices 449
  • Chronology 451
  • Selective Bibliography 462
  • Index 471
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