Kentucky: A Guide to the Bluegrass State

By Federal Writers' Project | Go to book overview

building are wide porches, evidently later additions. Two paneled doors give entrance to a wide central hall with two rooms on each side. A winding stairway leads to four bedrooms on the second floor. The original four-inch ash flooring is still in good condition.

In 1785 Col. Richard Taylor, a native of Virginia and soldier of the Revolution, brought his family to this place, where he built a log house. Several years later the present building, designed in Virginia, was built and the log cabin was moved to the rear to house slaves. This building, painted white, still stands.

Zachary Taylor ( 1784-1850), born in Virginia, was nine months old when the family came here. As a boy he roamed the fields near by and hunted along Beargrass Creek. He went to school in a little log schoolhouse near his home before entering William and Mary College. In 1808 he was appointed a first lieutenant in the 7th Regiment of the United States Infantry. Except when he was away on military duty and in the White House, the farm here was always his home. General Taylor's daughter, Knoxie, much against her father's wishes, became the wife of Jefferson Davis, later President of the Confederacy.

LOUISVILLE, 106.9 m. (525 alt., 307,745 pop.) (see Louisville).

Points of Interest: Speed Museum, Memorial Auditorium, Presbyterian Theological Seminary, Churchill Downs, Cave Hill Cemetery, Cherokee Park, and others.

Louisville is at the junction with US 31E (see Tour 6), US 31W (see Tour 7), and US 60 (see Tour 16).


Tour 12A

Junction with US 42 -- Butler Memorial State Park -- Owenton -- Junction with State 40; 61.1 m. US 227.

Hard-surfaced roadbed throughout.

Branch of Louisville & Nashville R.R. parallels route between Carrollton and Worthville.

All types of accommodations in towns; limited elsewhere.

This route runs between the Ohio River and the Bluegrass region, traversing hilly farm lands and fertile green valleys.

US 227 branches southeast from its junction with US 42, 0 m. (see Tour 12), 0.5 miles east of Carrollton.

BUTLER MEMORIAL STATE PARK (adm. 10¢, boating, fishing, overnight camping 25¢ each; furnished cabins, couple, $2), 2 m., 350 acres of hills and valleys on both sides of the road, was named for

-341-

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Kentucky: A Guide to the Bluegrass State
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword vii
  • Preface ix
  • Contents xi
  • List of Illustrations xv
  • List of Maps xxi
  • General Information xxiii
  • Calendar of Events xxvii
  • Part I - Kentucky: the General Background 1
  • Kentuckians 3
  • Natural Setting 7
  • Archeology and Indians 28
  • History 35
  • Agriculture 50
  • Transportation 56
  • Manufacturing and Mining 60
  • Labor 66
  • The Negro 72
  • Religion 77
  • Education 83
  • Folklore and Folk Music 89
  • Kentucky Thorough- Breds 94
  • Press and Radio 102
  • The Arts 110
  • Part II - Cities and Towns 137
  • Ashland 139
  • Covington 147
  • Frankfort 157
  • Harrodsburg 168
  • Louisville 175
  • Lexington 197
  • Paducah 221
  • Part III - Highways and Byways 231
  • Tour 1 233
  • Tour 2 242
  • Tour 3 246
  • Tour 4 261
  • Tour 4a 274
  • Tour 4b 279
  • Tour 5 280
  • Tour 6 288
  • Tour 7 296
  • Tour 7a 309
  • Tour 8 315
  • Tour 9 322
  • Tour 10 324
  • Tour 11 329
  • Tour 12 334
  • Tour 12a 341
  • Tour 13 344
  • Tour 14 351
  • Tour 15 362
  • Tour 16 387
  • Tour 17 414
  • Tour 17 A 419
  • Tour 18 424
  • Tour 19 433
  • Tour 20 441
  • Part IV - Appendices 449
  • Chronology 451
  • Selective Bibliography 462
  • Index 471
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