Kentucky: A Guide to the Bluegrass State

By Federal Writers' Project | Go to book overview

Johnson, an early Kentucky statesman. CROSSINGS CHURCH belongs to a Baptist congregation organized here May 28, 1785; this was the mother church from which sprang the religious organizations at McConnell's Run (later Stamping Ground), Dry Run, and Georgetown.

At 61.1 m. is the junction with State 40 (see Tour 17), 2.6 miles west of Georgetown.


Tour 13

Willow -- Falmouth -- Owenton -- New Castle -- Junction with US 60; 116.4 m. State 22.

Hard-surfaced roadbed throughout. Accommodations limited.

The route, following roughly the base of a triangle, two sides of which are formed by the Ohio River, passes through a rolling-to-hilly region that frequently affords superb views of the hills and river valleys. Tobacco of especially fine quality is produced in this area.

State 22 branches west from State 10 (see Tour 11) at WILLOW, 0 m., and at 12.1 m. passes the forks of the Licking River.

FALMOUTH, 12.4 m. (525 alt., 1,876 pop.) (see Tour 3), is at the junction with US 27 (see Tour 3).

Between Falmouth and 15.5 m. State 22 and US 27 are united.

WILLIAMSTOWN, 29.3 m. (943 alt., 917 pop.) (see Tour 4), is at the junction with US 25 (see Tour 4).

Between Williamstown and DRY RIDGE, 33.2 m. (929 alt., 500 pop.) (see Tour 4), State 22 and US 25 are united.

At 52.3 m. is the junction with US 227 (see Tour 12A); between this point and OWENTON, 54.4 m. (1,000 alt., 975 pop.) (see Tour 12A), State 22 and US 227 are united. Owenton is also at the junction with State 35 (see Tour 5).

GRATZ, 63.5 m. (139 pop.), a deserted river town on the western bank of the Kentucky River, was once a bustling and important shipping point. For more than 50 years steamers stopped at this landing to load and unload produce and receive passengers for Louisville or Cincinnati. A SULPHUR WELL (R), near the river, is 1,200 feet deep.

Right from Gratz on a dirt road to an old LEAD MINE, 1 m., which has not been worked for many years.

At 64 m. on State 22 is the junction with State 83, an improved highway.

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