Kentucky: A Guide to the Bluegrass State

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Tour 17 A

Paris -- Boonesboro -- Richmond, 39.1 m.; US 227.

Hard-surfaced roadbed throughout. All types of accommodations in towns; limited elsewhere.

Between Paris and Richmond US 227 winds through that part of eastern Kentucky where the inner Bluegrass gives way to the outer Bluegrass, with a hint here and there of the mountains whose foothills begin only a few miles to the east. The highway passes black locust trees near gates and roadways; wide pastures shaded with twisted oak, black walnut, and beech trees; stock farms outlined by wooden fences and old limestone walls, some made by slave labor; great barns, many with the side ventilators indicating their use for tobacco storage; and houses less over-modernized and pretentious than many found near Lexington. Spring brings out the wild locust bloom; and the honeysuckle, wild rose, and trumpet vine clamber over the fences. In the stonier sections the blue-berried red cedar comes up. There are scatterings of woodland -- scraggly second-growth hickory, oak, maple, and sycamore -- but the greater part of the landscape is divided into wide squares of bluegrass, corn, and such soil-improving crops as clover, rye, and alfalfa. The tobacco patches are smaller, but they grow a white burley that is thinner and finer than silk.

This region is so generous that it was among the first to draw settlers, who risked torture and death at the hands of the Indians, determined to keep their hunting grounds. Besides descendants of these first settlers, many of whom still live here, there are a few wealthy Eastern sportsmen and gentlemen farmers.

US 227 branches south from PARIS, 0 m. (826 alt., 6,204 pop.) (see Tour 15), which is at the junction with US 68 (see Tour 15), State 40 (see Tour 17), and US 27 (see Tour 3).

South of Paris horse farms stretch along both sides of the road. Their stone, wire, and wood paddocks run end-to-end from the edge of the highway back across the gently uneven fields dotted with oaks and other trees; a few horses can be seen in one or another of the checkerboard pastures. Unlike the big wealthy farms around Lexington, most of these farms are not show places, but the use of low, weathered stone fences for paddocks lends a special charm to the scene.

In the CLAIBORNE THOROUGHBRED STUD BARN (open on request), 1.3 m. (L), owned by A. B. Hancock, were foaled some of the greatest thoroughbreds in the history of racing, including Gallant Fox, a Derby

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Kentucky: A Guide to the Bluegrass State
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword vii
  • Preface ix
  • Contents xi
  • List of Illustrations xv
  • List of Maps xxi
  • General Information xxiii
  • Calendar of Events xxvii
  • Part I - Kentucky: the General Background 1
  • Kentuckians 3
  • Natural Setting 7
  • Archeology and Indians 28
  • History 35
  • Agriculture 50
  • Transportation 56
  • Manufacturing and Mining 60
  • Labor 66
  • The Negro 72
  • Religion 77
  • Education 83
  • Folklore and Folk Music 89
  • Kentucky Thorough- Breds 94
  • Press and Radio 102
  • The Arts 110
  • Part II - Cities and Towns 137
  • Ashland 139
  • Covington 147
  • Frankfort 157
  • Harrodsburg 168
  • Louisville 175
  • Lexington 197
  • Paducah 221
  • Part III - Highways and Byways 231
  • Tour 1 233
  • Tour 2 242
  • Tour 3 246
  • Tour 4 261
  • Tour 4a 274
  • Tour 4b 279
  • Tour 5 280
  • Tour 6 288
  • Tour 7 296
  • Tour 7a 309
  • Tour 8 315
  • Tour 9 322
  • Tour 10 324
  • Tour 11 329
  • Tour 12 334
  • Tour 12a 341
  • Tour 13 344
  • Tour 14 351
  • Tour 15 362
  • Tour 16 387
  • Tour 17 414
  • Tour 17 A 419
  • Tour 18 424
  • Tour 19 433
  • Tour 20 441
  • Part IV - Appendices 449
  • Chronology 451
  • Selective Bibliography 462
  • Index 471
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