Kentucky: A Guide to the Bluegrass State

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souri, where their fourth child, Samuel L. Clemens ( Mark Twain), was born.

EDMONTON, 231.2 m. (800 alt., 237 pop.), overlooking the Little Barren River, is an unincorporated community, but is the seat of Metcalfe County. The town is named for Edmond Rogers, a soldier of Virginia, who came to Kentucky after the Revolutionary War. He acquired 20,000 acres of land and a large number of slaves, and laid out a town here.

The TRIGG FISH HATCHERY (L), 246.8 m., is the only spring-fed hatchery operated by the State.

GLASGOW, 249.9 m. (780 alt., 5,042 pop.) (see Tour 6), is at the junction with US 31E (see Tour 6) and State 90 (see Tour 20).

Between Glasgow and Merry Oaks the route continues through an oil field that has not been fully developed.

MERRY OAKS, 261.3 m. (67 pop.), is the locale of Cordia Greer Petrie 's Angeline, stories of the rural Kentuckian's reaction to the city life of Louisville.

A quarry (R) at 265.5 m. produces Bowling Green oölitic limestone.

At 274.6 m. is the junction with US 68 (see Tour 15) and US 31W (see Tour 7) 6.7 miles east of Bowling Green.


Tour 19

(Williamson, W. Va.) -- Pikeville -- Jenkins -- Junction with US 25E; US 119. West Virginia Line to Junction with US 25E, 165.9 m.

Hard-surfaced roadbed throughout. Louisville & Nashville R.R. roughly parallels route between Lynch and Pineville. Accommodations chiefly in towns.

US 119 crosses a rugged and long-isolated region twisting around high mountain shoulders, where each turn of the road reveals range after range of dark green wooded slopes, beautiful in the spring with the snowy white, pink, and deep red of the rhododendron and wild azalea, and where the narrow, winding valleys echo with the sound of the waterfalls and rapids in the clear streams. At intervals along the highway are lonely little log cabins perched on ridges or half-hidden in the coves; patches of cornfields on the steep hillsides; and the unsightly shacks of small mining settlements. The northern part of the route traverses the valley of the Big Sandy and its forks, the Levisa and the Tug, a favorite hunting ground of the Shawnee, the Cherokee, and

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