Hispanic American Relations with the United States

By William Spence Robertson; David Kinley | Go to book overview

CHAPTER III
POLITICAL INFLUENCE OF THE UNITED STATES IN
HISPANIC AMERICA

The influence of the United States upon the Spanish-American revolution--Vicente Rocafuerte disseminates United States political ideals--Mexico's Constitutions of 1824 --Her later Constitutions--Central American Constitutions--Manuel García de Sena as a propagandist--Venezuela's Declaration of Independence and first Constitution--Later Venezuelan Constitutions--The translations of Miguel de Pombo--The Constitutions of New Granada--United States Constitutions in Peru--Camilo Henríquez in Chile-- The Chilean Constitutions--North American political ideals in the Provinces of la Plata--The Uruguayan Constitution of 1830--Manuel Dorrego--Early Argentine Constitutions--Juan B. Alberdi and Argentina's Constitution of 1853--Paraguay's Constitution of 1870--Republican ideas in monarchical Brazil--The Brazilian Constitution of 1891.

The earliest political influence of the United States upon the Hispanic-American nations was exerted during the protracted Revolution which separated the Spanish-American colonies from the motherland. In that age of transition intellectual reactions between the United States and Spanish America began. We shall accordingly notice the participation of some citizens of the United States in the movements which culminated in the independence of the Spanish-American nations. That participation was promoted by certain revolutionary leaders: Aguirre, Carrera, Mina, and Miranda. During the kaleidoscopic transformations of the Spanish-American Revolution the Revolution of the English colonists in North America served as an inspiration to certain leaders.

Two illustrations must here suffice. In a rare pamphlet entitled Lettre aux Espagnols-Américains, which was written by Father Juan Pablo Viscardo y Guzmán, a Jesuit who had been exiled from South America, that priest said, "The valor with which the English colonists in America fought for the liberty that they gloriously enjoy shames our indolence; we yield the

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