Hispanic American Relations with the United States

By William Spence Robertson; David Kinley | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VII
INDUSTRIAL ENTERPRISES OF UNITED STATES
CITIZENS IN HISPANIC AMERICA

William Wheelwright and steam navigation in the Pacific-United States steamship lines to Hispanic-American ports--Wheelwright as a railway promoter in South America-Henry Meiggs as a railway contractor in Chile and Peru--The Madeira and Mamoré Railroad--The railroad from Guayaquil to Quito--The PananA Railroad Company--Yankee railway enterprise in Mexico--American international telegraph companies--United States mining companies in Mexico, Central America, Peru, Chile, and Bolivia--Asphalt and petroleum companies in northern South America--The banking facilities of the United States in Hispanic America--The American International Corporation--Grace and Company-United States investments in Hispanic- American countries--The construction of the Panama Canal.

The story of the industrial enterprise of United States citizens in Hispanic America is interwoven with the commercial relations between the United States and that vast region. At various points that story is connected with attempts of citizens of the United States to establish steamship lines between Hispanic-American states and other countries. Some notable achievements of Yankees have been the construction of railroads in different sections of Hispanic America. United States citizens have attempted to bind North and South America closer together by laying submarine cables. In recent years they have established colossal mining plants in Mexico and South America. They have also planted in South America branches of United States banks--banks which seem destined to perform most valuable functions by promoting relations between United States investors and the peoples of Hispanic America. Such manifestations of the industrial enterprise of citizens of the United States in Hispanic America this chapter will consider in some detail.

Those citizens evidently helped to make known to the peoples of Hispanic America certain inventions and appliances that had

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