Hispanic American Relations with the United States

By William Spence Robertson; David Kinley | Go to book overview
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CHAPTER VIII
EDUCATIONAL CONTACT BETWEEN THE UNITED
STATES AND HISPANIC-AMERICAN NATIONS

Emigration from the United States to Hispanic-American countries--The Influence of United States writers in Hispanic America--Domingo F. Sarmiento as an apostle of educational reform in Chile and Argentina--José P. Varela in Uruguay--Hispanic- American students in the United States--Methodist missions, churches, and educational institutions in Hispanic-American Countries--Presbyterian activities--Other Protestant sects--The American Bible Society--The Young Men's Christian Association-- A statistical summary of Protestant organizations of the United States in Hispanic- American countries--The attitude of the United States toward the struggle for religious liberty in Chile, Peru, Ecuador, and Bolivia.

The social structure of Hispanic America originally differed from that of the United States in manifold ways. For the genius of the Hispanic American is ordinarily different from that of the person whom he styles the North American, the Anglo American, or the Yankee. Only in those parts of Hispanic America where an element of population similar to that which emigrated to the United States predominates, do intellectual conditions--to say nothing of social, economic, or political conditions--tend to approximate those in the United States. It is the purpose of this chapter to describe the manner in which the United States has affected the Hispanic-American nations through emigration, literary ideals, school systems, religious faiths, and ideals of religious liberty, all of which may in a broad sense be termed educational influences.

The earliest emigrants from the United States to Spanish- American countries were doubtless some adventurous persons who enlisted under the banners of such leaders as Morelos, Bolívar, and San Martín. During the revolutionary era, or soon afterwards, a few citizens of the United States who were interested in trade or commerce settled in commercial cities of Spanish America. Such immigrants were mentioned in diplomatic

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