John Bunyan (1628-1688): His Life, Times, and Work

By John Brown; Frank Mott Harrison | Go to book overview

XII.
THE PLACE OF THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS IN
LITERATURE.

HAVING looked at the relation the two parts of The Pilgrim's Progress sustain to each other, it may be interesting to form some estimate of the book as a whole, and to account for its widespread and various influence. In attempting to do so it would be beside our purpose to compare it with the few kingly books enthroned on the supreme heights of literature, and reigning there by common suffrage of civilised nations and successive centuries. There is no need to demand entrance for it where entrance would not be willingly and universally accorded. This allegory has its distinctive merits and its own distinct place in the short roll-call of really illustrious books.

One of the foremost causes of its success is that with such singular felicity it meets a pre-existing love of metaphor, fable, parable, and allegory, which is deeply rooted in human nature. How congenial this form of literature was to the temperament of the Oriental, no one with the Bible in his hand needs to be told. Nor is the love of it confined to the glowing East or to the Sunny South. Kriloff has shown that even on the snowy steppes of the ungenial North, the Russian peasant finds a new charm for his intellect and a fresh glow for his feeling in mindpictures based upon the instinctive conviction that the outward world of fact and form stands in vital relation with the inward world of personal experience and abstract truth.

Not that we are to suppose that allegory has been made to minister merely to the pleasures of the imagination. There has usually been serious earnest purpose beneath the charm of the story. It has either set forth the pregnant choice made at fateful moments of human life between folly and wisdom, between pleasure and duty, with the far-reaching consequences resulting from the choice; or, and this perhaps more frequently, it has become a protest under thinly veiled disguise against the oppressor's wrong and the proud man's contumely. The two

-271-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
John Bunyan (1628-1688): His Life, Times, and Work
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 522

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.