20
The Brezhnev-Castro
Doctrine

THE ORGANIZED PAEANS FOR the dead Ernesto Guevara could not disguise the fact that the loss of his guerrilla force represented a serious setback for Fidel Castro. Despite a show of optimism, it was clear that similar revolutions in Latin America had little chance of success. To the orthodox communists, with no stomach for the bloody consequences of real revolution, Guevara's death must have come as a relief. The Soviets had been proved correct. Journalists in Western Europe and in Moscow published I-told-you-so commentaries, explaining why and how the Cubans had failed. The French Marxist Jacques Arnault, writing in L'Humanité , wondered if Castro had willingly—or unwittingly—sent Guevara to a certain death in Bolivia. And Pravda, on October 25, printed an essay by an Argentine Marxist, Rodolfo Ghioldi, that denounced the Cuban policy of exporting revolutions. Ghioldi did not mention Castro by name, but his implications were obvious even to the casual reader. The Kremlin's timing could not have been worse. Moscow was preparing for the fiftieth anniversary of the Bolshevik revolution, and the Soviet leaders hoped that Castro would attend the celebrations. Instead, he fired off a heated protest to the editors of Pravda, who promptly and somewhat lamely apologized. Both he and Dorticós boycotted the November festivities in the Soviet capital, and as a calculated slap at the Kremlin leadership they sent a third-stringer instead, the health minister, Ramón Machado Ventura. 1

To Kremlin watchers the absence of the Chinese and Albanians could not have come as a surprise. But the failure of the Cubans to send one or more top-level officials to Moscow was noteworthy. Machado met Premier Kosygin and dutifully placed a wreath on the tomb of Lenin, but he failed to

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Fidel Castro
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Fidel Castro *
  • Contents *
  • Preface *
  • 1: The Making of a Revolutionary *
  • 2: History Will Absolve Me *
  • 3: In Durance Vile *
  • 4: A Stranger in a Strange Land *
  • 5: The Sierra Maestra *
  • 6: The General Strike *
  • 7: The Rebel Victory *
  • 8: Rebels in Power *
  • 9: The Maximum Leader *
  • 10: Foreign Visitors *
  • 11: Cuba Yes! Yankees No! *
  • 12: The Bay of Pigs *
  • 13: A Conversion *
  • 14: The Smell of Burning *
  • 15: In the Land of the Giants *
  • 16: The Informer *
  • 17: The New Man *
  • 18: A Little Heresy *
  • 19: Death in a Small Hut *
  • 20: The Brezhnev-Castro Doctrine *
  • 21: Outside the Game *
  • 22: The F-1 Hybrid *
  • 23: Ten Million Tons *
  • 24: Poets and Prisoners *
  • 25: March of the Empty Pots *
  • 26: The World Traveler *
  • 27: A Door Slammed *
  • 28: Cuba in Africa *
  • 29: A Sea of Difficulties *
  • 30: Behold a Pale Horse *
  • Notes *
  • Index *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 898

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.