Ideology and Art: Theories of Mass Culture from Walter Benjamin to Umberto Eco

By Robin Ridless | Go to book overview
Save to active project

Chapter II
BERTOLT BRECHT: THE AUTHOR AS PRODUCER

The relationship between the critic and the artist described by Benjamin in "The Author as Producer" works well to describe the relationship between himself and Brecht. Optimally, the work of art concretely embodies a new act or mode of judgment. The criticism of the work of art then translates into abstract terms the meaning of this passage into another state of consciousness. The experiencing of the innovative work of art leads to an unconscious knowledge, which the critic exposes, as the psychoanalyst, the dream.

Brecht's cultural experiments were the coal from which Benjamin dredged his theoretical diamonds. ( Brecht also played critic to his own work, so there is nothing perjorative in this statement.) The following chapter explores the practical dimension of what has been talked about. Brecht used art to agitate people with political mind-sets. He worked with structure rather than exhortation. His dramaturgy used an abstract theory in concrete ways. A discussion of it will thus add flesh to the structural/ aesthetic approach to politics taken by this piece.

-61-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Ideology and Art: Theories of Mass Culture from Walter Benjamin to Umberto Eco
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 234

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?