The Next Ten Years in British Social and Economic Policy

By G. D. H. Cole | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XVI
EDUCATION

Recent educational progress reviewed—The rise in educational standards— The 'economy' campaign—The Report of the Hadow Committee— Defects of the present administrative system—The false division between 'elementary' and 'higher' education—Growth of the 'elementary' system —Central Schools—Need for unification of administrative control— Primary and post-primary education—The present position of 'secondary' education—Raising the school-leaving age—A new secondary school system—The curriculum—The place of manual education—Should the schools provide vocational training?—Secondary education for all—The Grammar Schools and their functions—Future of the school-leaving age —Free places and maintenance allowances—Class-divisions in the educational system—Administrative reforms—Scotland—The problem of educational areas—Regional Universities—The school medical services— The supply and equipment of teachers—The teachers and the Universities—The State in relation to University education—University extramural education—Research at the Universities—A standing Universities Commission—State grants for University work—The development of Adult Education—The Workers' Educational Association—Adult Education and the Trade Unions—Education versus propaganda—The National Council of Labour Colleges—The problem of State grants— The need for better adolescent education—A summary of immediate reforms.

The British educational system has made notable advances during the past quarter of a century, and even—despite 'economy' campaigns—during the past ten years. Teaching methods have greatly improved, especially in the elementary schools; the status and quality of the teaching profession have been substantially raised; a large and expanding system of public secondary education has grown up, and has been considerably supplemented of late by the development of schools of the 'central' or 'higher elementary' type; access to the Universities is a good deal easier for poor boys than it used to be; and adult education in its various forms has taken a recognised and

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