Our Southern Zion: A History of Calvinism in the South Carolina Low Country, 1690-1990

By Erskine Clarke | Go to book overview

6 Competing Impulses Tories, Whigs, and the Revolution

IN THE American Revolution, South Carolinians fought a bloody civil war and not simply a war between opposing armies. "Savage" is the way many contemporaries described the often brutal fighting that raged across the state, especially after 1780. "The Whigs and Tories," wrote General Nathanael Greene, "pursue one another with the most relentless fury, killing and destroying each other wherever they meet."1

As many as one-fifth of South Carolina's whites may have taken the path of loyalty to Great Britain in 1775. After the fall of Charlestown to the British in 1780, another substantial group of white Carolinians, "protectionists," came forward and took an oath of allegiance to the king. Some of these protectionists were rebels at heart--some, including Rawlins Lowndes, Charles Pinckney, Daniel Horry, and Arthur Middleton, had even been leaders in the Revolution--but believed the British had all but won the war and that it was time to accept defeat. Others were Loyalists at heart but had accepted the earlier American victories and remained in the state under the revolutionary government. Thus a neat classification of people into either a Loyalist or a Patriot camp was not always easy to make, for as the fortunes of war ebbed and flowed for one side or the other, Carolinians were forced to decide their allegiance not one time but several. Of course there were also those who took their stand early and did not deviate. Some refused to abandon their allegiance to Britain and regarded those who did as lawbreakers and rebels. Others were uncompromising revolutionaries determined that the land be free of foreign control.2

Given such divisions, it is not surprising that those in the low country who stood in the Reformed tradition also divided and that their divisions were bitter and sometimes ambiguous. The Revolution brought forcefully into the open the tensions and antithetical impulses inherent in the Reformed tradition, illustrated the role of social context in shaping which impulse would dominate which part of the Reformed community in the low country, and pointed toward the ways the community would seek in the years ahead to find some via media between the competing tendencies of its tradition.

The divisions within the Reformed community were most clearly revealed

-89-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Our Southern Zion: A History of Calvinism in the South Carolina Low Country, 1690-1990
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 436

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.