Our Southern Zion: A History of Calvinism in the South Carolina Low Country, 1690-1990

By Erskine Clarke | Go to book overview

Index
abolitionists, 180, 183-89
Adam, Smith, 265
Adams, Ennals, 234, 237, 244, 305, 366 (n. 24)
Adams, Hugh, 52, 303
Adams, Nehemiah, 358 (n. 4)
Adams, Robert M., 305
Adams, William H., 309
Address, Occasioned by the Late Invasion of the Liberties of the American Colonies by the British Parliament, 93
Adger, James, 144, 151, 156, 263, 346 (n. 10)
Adger, James, and Company, 263
Adger, John B., 120, 156, 158, 165, 226, 262, 269, 281, 305, 309; and Denmark Vesey revolt, 122; at Evangelical Alliance, 187-89; as minister of Anson Street Presbyterian Church, 195; and paternalistic vision, 364 (n. 43); photo of, 167; proposes new work among African Americans, 189-91; and secession, 211; as Unionist, 201, 211
Adger, Robert: as leader of Zion Presbyterian Church, 195-96, 226
Adger family, 198, 263-64, 265
Adopting Act, 48, 49
Africa, 33-34
African Americans: and American Revolution, 102-4, 334 (n. 50); begin to join churches, 64, 86-88, 326 (n. 7); and colonial society, 33; as domestics, 160, 349 (n. 60); and the Great Awakening, 86-88; images of, 1; influence on low country culture, 105, 273-74; join churches different from those of white owners, 159-60; membership in white-dominated churches, 125-31; and modernity, 229-31, 240; re-order lives after Civil War, 218-20. See also spirituals
African American community: early history of, 34; and Northern migration, 231-32; schools of, 217, 237, 242
African American Reformed community: and baptism, 86, 135-37; character of during slavery, 130-35; "character type" of members, 135; class leaders of, 129, 234; coherence of, 243-56, 283, 285-86; and Congregational churches, 217-18, 243, 255; continuity of, 235-36, 247-48, 249, 283-84; discipline in, 129, 196, 254; as distinctly Reformed, 230, 284; on Edisto Island, 225-26, 252, 285; emergence of, 125; and emphasis on education, 162, 282, 284-85; establishment of independent congregations within, 232-36; free blacks in, 160-61, 234; following emancipation, 229-42; ideological needs of, 248, 252; ignored by historians of region, 315 (n. 22); and joining the community, 131-35; limited expansion of, beyond antebellum roots, 255-56, 283, 286; loss of membership, 234; and modernity, 230-31; as part of two worlds, 140-41, 229-42, 249, 252-53, 255-56; poor funds of, 129; in post-World War II period, 283-86; and reculturation, 230-31, 236, 238, 239, 240, 247-48; relationship to white society, 130, 248; remembers its past, 239-42, 248; role of, 247; and rural congregations, 162, 233-34, 235-36; school system of, 243-49; slaves and Lord's Supper, 65-69; social profiles of, 7, 142, 159-62, 249-52, 255- 56, 284-86; as a subgroup, 6-7, 129-30, 252-53, 255-66, 275, 345 (n. 1);

-405-

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