Travel Culture: Essays on What Makes Us Go

By Carol Traynor Williams | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

LIKE ALL EDITIONS, this one owes the most to its contributors and to other "friends of the subject." Travel culture's best friend is surely Ray B. Browne, who asked me in 1994 if I would write about teaching travel culture for his edition about popular culture in the twenty-first century. Could I really write about my favorite bedtime reading, travel adventures? Ray and Pat Browne have gone on supporting the new subculture of popular culture with sections on travel culture I have chaired at the national Popular Culture Association conferences; a number of the pieces in this book, and their authors, were met at these, the fun conferences.

I am grateful to my dean, Al Bennett, and to the Roosevelt University faculty committee, which awarded me a faculty research leave that allowed me to put this book together at my home in Southwest Harbor, Maine. In Maine and the East, I thank Anne Street of New York City and Janet Reed of Tremont, Maine, for oral histories (which have turned out to be mostly for the next book), and Heidi Bliss, of the Harvard Department of Visual and Environmental Studies, who gave me books and papers on travel and film, including the essay by Tom Gunning that is reprinted in this collection; for that, for finding (with the help of the Tozzer Library staff) the unfindable source during production--and, most of all, for her friendship--I am very grateful.

Thanks to Nichols Fox, of Bass Harbor, Maine, for research leads; to Sheila Wilensky, for Oz Books and help (good teacher that she is) in clarifying what cultural anthropology does; to Lorraine Saunders and the staff and volunteers of the Southwest Harbor Library, for finding "everything" almost always at the last minute; and to Doug Hodgdon, for listening, talking, and reading (for editing the editor)--and for naming the book.

Praeger convention manager Marietta Yannetti, and editors Nina Pearlstein, Elisabetta Linton, and vice-president Jim Sabin were helpful, as were my copyeditor, Suzanne Solensky, and my production editor, Deborah Whitford.

-ix-

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