Travel Culture: Essays on What Makes Us Go

By Carol Traynor Williams | Go to book overview

Route 66: Still Kickin' for Students and International Visitors

TERRI RYBURN-LAMONTE

I WAS FIVE years old when my family moved from Illinois to California along Route 66. It was 1953 and Route 66 was a very busy road, with many families traveling for vacations, as well as to hoped-for plentiful jobs in sunny, magical California. My father built a homemade camper on the back of our pickup truck, complete with a chicken wire top, which held gunnysacks of our clothes and other necessities. He covered the wire with canvas that had roll-up sides, both to protect against the weather and to provide ventilation to my three brothers, me, and the two hunting dogs who filled the back of the truck. He, my mother, and my younger brother occupied the cab of the truck. With children and canvas flapping in the wind, we set off for our big adventure! We camped out along the way, sleeping in and under the truck at whatever pull-offs my father could find. This trip made such an impression on me that I have become a Route 66 enthusiast and, among other things, have taught a course about the road, as well as conducted a survey of international visitors to determine what brought them to America to travel Route 66.

In 1926 construction began on an American institution--Route 66. Upon completion, the highway "reached across more than 2,400 miles, three time zones, and eight states" 1 from Chicago to Santa Monica, California. In time, Route 66 became a symbol of America's heritage of travel and of our desire to make a better life for ourselves by moving west. The road was especially important to rural areas. Many small, sleepy towns came to life as the road snaked its way through them. Restaurants, gas stations, truck stops, and other businesses sprang up along the road to accommodate Dust Bowl refugees, business travelers, and vacationers who traveled Route 66. As America grew, with the resulting demand for faster and safer roads, the original two-lane road was replaced by a four-lane highway that closely paralleled the first, but skirted the towns. Some businesses moved closer to the road; others counted on the "Business Route 66" signs to funnel traffic off the new

-121-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Travel Culture: Essays on What Makes Us Go
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 196

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.