A Nation by Rights: National Cultures, Sexual Identity Politics, and the Discourse of Rights

By Carl F. Stychin | Go to book overview

2
The Nation's Rights and National Rites

This first case study of national cultures, sexual identity politics, and the discourse of rights begins with a national culture frequently described as the paradigmatic culture of rights: the United States. I start with the United States with some hesitation. In commencing with "America" -- the world's only remaining superpower, a nation state whose rights culture at times has assumed imperialist dimensions -- I am aware of the danger of reinforcing such a dominant position. In the remainder of this book, I will argue that the construction of rights in the United States represents a particular balance of interests, one that is not necessarily replicated in other rights cultures. However, I give the United States a central place in this study because, without doubt, rights have assumed a vital role in the constitution of national identity. Moreover, sexuality and sexual identities have proven a central site of American political struggle in recent years, which has been articulated through rights rhetoric as well as claims regarding the meaning of the national culture. Those disputes have also entered into the international consciousness (which will be apparent in my other case studies), although perhaps not to the extent that Americans frequently assume.

Given the tremendous amount of attention that issues of sexuality, rights, and nation receive in the United States -- in academic, political, and popular discourses -- it is difficult to draw attention to the United States as simply one of a series of studies. The voluminous literature and range of issues currently the subject of debate and struggle can (and do) give rise to several books in themselves. Consequently, in this chapter I focus primarily on a single judicial decision to illustrate a number of different themes that connect the three central trajectories of this book: nations, sexualities,

-21-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Nation by Rights: National Cultures, Sexual Identity Politics, and the Discourse of Rights
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Introduction 1
  • 2 - The Nation's Rights and National Rites 21
  • 3 - Righting Wrongs 52
  • 4 - Queer Nations 89
  • 5 - Eurocentrism 115
  • 6 - Reimagining Australia 145
  • 7 - Concluding Remarks 194
  • Notes 203
  • References 223
  • Index 247
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 252

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.