A Nation by Rights: National Cultures, Sexual Identity Politics, and the Discourse of Rights

By Carl F. Stychin | Go to book overview

Notes

Chapter One
1
Anderson's thesis has been subject to critique from a variety of angles; see, e.g., Balakrishnan 1996, p. 208, arguing that "the cultural affinities shaped by print-capitalism do not in themselves seem sufficiently resonant to generate the colossal sacrifices that modern peoples are at times willing to make for their nation"; Chatterjee 1996, who notes the specificity of anticolonial nationalism in Asia and Africa; Eisenstein 1996, p. 52, arguing that Anderson "does not recognize that nationalism is an instance of phallocratic construction. . . . Nor does he recognize racism as part of the historical articulation of the nation." For my purposes, it is Anderson's insight that national communities are "imagined" which is of prime importance.
2
I will return to the impact of membership in the European Union on national identity in chapter five.
3
The role of legal discourse in the constitution of national identities is itself an interesting issue and one I return to throughout this book.
4
I consider this point in greater detail in chapter four.
5
One of McClintock's particular areas of interest is South Africa, and I will focus specifically on gendered and sexualized constructions of national identity in South Africa in chapter three.
6
I develop this argument in more detail in chapter five.
7
As Halley 1996, p. 95, cautions, "reading native culture from a western perspective may occlude everything that is distinctive about it; mining native culture as a source for legal reform can be a gesture of neo-colonial appropriation"; see also Harris 1996.
8
On national/sexual "panic attacks," see Edelman 1994, Harper 1994.
9
Sinfield 1996, p. 281, interestingly refers to this phenomenon of the enemy within as "a kind of reverse diaspora."
10
For Berlant 1991a, p. 113, it is "the power to suppress" the white, male body that signifies this cultural authority. This point bears interesting connections to Yingling's 1994 analysis of HIV and national identity. In particular, the disfiguring effects of some HIV related diseases -- particularly Kaposi's sarcoma -- are graphically embodied, thereby erasing any cultural authority previously possessed by the bearer. I consider these themes in the specific context of the United States in chapter two.

-203-

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A Nation by Rights: National Cultures, Sexual Identity Politics, and the Discourse of Rights
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Introduction 1
  • 2 - The Nation's Rights and National Rites 21
  • 3 - Righting Wrongs 52
  • 4 - Queer Nations 89
  • 5 - Eurocentrism 115
  • 6 - Reimagining Australia 145
  • 7 - Concluding Remarks 194
  • Notes 203
  • References 223
  • Index 247
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