Getting Doctors to Listen: Ethics and Outcomes Data in Context

By Philip J. Boyle | Go to book overview

PHILIP J. BOYLE AND DANIEL CALLAHAN


Physicians' Use of Outcomes Data:
Moral Conflicts and
Potential Resolutions

Background

Is clinical medicine best thought of as a science or an art? 1 The question is an old one, now given a fresh life by the powerful movement to develop outcomes data and practice guidelines. The assumption behind the movement is that a combination of good data and well-crafted guidelines will save money and more effectively serve patient care. It is an assumption that is heavily biased toward construing medicine more as science than as art.

Such a bias does not always sit well with practicing physicians. Sinclair Lewis caught the flavor of physicians' unease in a conversation between two doctors in his now classic novel Arrowsmith, written in 1924:

Doctor, do you find you can do much with asthma? Well now, Doctor, just in confidence, I'm going to tell you something that may strike you as funny, but I believe foxes' lungs are just fine for asthma, and T.B. too. I told that to a Sioux City pulmonary specialist one time and he laughed at me—said it wasn't scientific . . . I said "But I get results, and that's what I'm looking for." ... I swear I believe most of these damn' alleged scientists could learn a whale of a lot from the plain country practitioners, let me tell you!

In a recent study carried out by The Hastings Center, we sought to study this time-worn issue in the context of the renewed effort to influence physicians' behavior by providing them with better science and helpful guidelines for their clinical practice. What is new, perhaps unique, about the issue and found in the outcomes enterprise is a shift from physician reliance on traditional biomedical reasoning to a reliance on probabilistic statistical reasoning. 2 We had noted that, for all of the technical skills being deployed to develop good data, something seemed missing. While some research has examined changing

-3-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Getting Doctors to Listen: Ethics and Outcomes Data in Context
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 234

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.