Toulouse-Lautrec, Paintings, Drawings, Posters and Lithographs: Exhibition Dates, March 20-May 6, 1956, Museum of Modern Art, New York

By Museum of Modern Art; Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec | Go to book overview

TOULOUSE-LAUTREC: A CHRONOLOGY by Anne Dahlgren Hecht
1864 Henri-Marie-Raymond de Toulouse-Lautrec-Monfa born November 24, in Albi,
at the Hôtel du Bosc, home of his paternal grandmother. His mother is Adèle
Tapié de Céleyran, first cousin of his father, Count Alphonse Toulouse-Lautrec-
Monfa. Typically, his father, an ardent sportsman, and an eccentric in the grand
manner, is hunting at the time of his son's birth.
1868 Henri's only brother, born the year before, is christened. Henri insists on signing
the baptismal register with the drawing of an ox. The death of this younger
brother soon after leaves Henri an only child, but he is surrounded by a large
family of cousins, two of whom are his boon companions throughout life: Louis
Pascal and Gabriel Tapié de Céleyran.
1872 The Toulouse-Lautrec family moves to Paris for the school year, although they
continue the rounds of the family châteaux during vacations: those of his par-
ents -- Le Bosc and Céleyran -- as well as those of other members of the family.
Henri is enrolled as a day student in the Lycée Fontanes (now Condorcet) and
lives at the Hôtel Pérey, 5 Cité du Retiro (a courtyard between the rue Faubourg
St.-Honoré and the rue Boissy d'Anglas). He is an outstanding student. Two
of his schoolmates are his future biographer and closest friend, Maurice Joyant
and his cousin, Louis Pascal.
1875 As a result of poor health, Henri is withdrawn from school. He continues his
education with tutors, under the supervision of his mother.
1878-1879 In May, 1878, the boy slips on the floor of the drawing room at Albi and breaks
a thigh bone. He breaks the other in August of 1879, while walking in the coun-
try with his mother, who has taken him to Barèges for his convalescence from
the first accident. Through improper healing of them both he becomes deformed.
During his convalescence he takes up drawing seriously. His father's friend, the
deaf-mute sporting painter René Princeteau, becomes his first teacher. It is
through Princeteau that Henri meets the sporting painter John Lewis Brown,
and also Jean-Louis Forain, both of whom influence his style. During this time,
the boy contributes drawings to the newspaper of his old lycée. His first subjects
are horses and dogs.
1881 Fails his baccalaureate examination in Paris, but passes at Toulouse in October.
On the advice of Princeteau, enters the studio of the academic painter Léon
Bonnat.
1882 Transfers to the studio of Fernand Cormon, another academician. Toulouse-
Lautrec begins making artistic friends -- Henri Rachou, Emile Bernard, Adolphe
Albert, François Gauzi, Joseph Albert, and René Grenier. These men continue
to appear in the backgrounds of Lautrec's paintings through the years.

-3-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Toulouse-Lautrec, Paintings, Drawings, Posters and Lithographs: Exhibition Dates, March 20-May 6, 1956, Museum of Modern Art, New York
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 48

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.