New York City Guide: A Comprehensive Guide to the Five Boroughs of the Metropolis: Manhattan, Brooklyn, the Bronx, Queens, and Richmond

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East Bronx

ST. MARY'S PARK -- HUNT'S POINT -- CLA
SON'S POINT -- THROG'S NECK -- CITY ISLAND
-- HART'S ISLAND

Area: Willis Ave., Westchester Ave., and Hutchinson River east to the East River and Long Island Sound.

Principal highways: Whitlock Ave. and Eastern Blvd.

Transportation: IRT Pelham subway, 3d Ave. to Pelham Bay Park stations.

THE influence of Manhattan on the eastern portion of the Bronx that borders Long Island Sound and the East River has been negligible. The settlements along the irregular coast penetrated by Eastchester Bay, Baxter Creek Inlet, Westchester and Pugsley's creeks, and the Bronx River bear some resemblance to the coastal towns of New England. The only populous parts of this section lie in the south around St. Mary's Park and in the north near Pelham Bay Park. The other areas are sparsely developed residential sections, once the site of the manors of early Manhattan millionaires. City Island, the largest of the islands that lie off the coast, is a picturesque boat-building center.

ST. MARY'S PARK, the nondescript neighborhood surrounding a municipal park of the same name, was part of the land purchased by Jonas Bronk in 1641 from two Indian sachems, Ranaque and Tackamuck. Bronksland, his estate, extended along the eastern shore from the Muscoota (Harlem) to the Aquahung (Bronx) rivers. His mansion was called Emmans and stood south of the present junction of Willis Avenue and 132d Street. One historian noted that Bronk "used silver on his table and had tablecloths . . . and possessed as many as six linen shirts." In the eighteenth and the first half of the nineteenth century members of the famous Morris family made their home in this district. The Gouverneur Morris mansion stood near what is now Cypress Avenue and 132d Street, and close by was the house of Lewis Morris IV.

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