New Jersey: A Guide to Its Present and Past

By Federal Writers' Project (N.J.) | Go to book overview

Bayonne
Railroad Station. W. 8th St. and Ave. C. for Jersey Central R.R.
Buses: Fare 5.
Streetcars and Busses: Fare 5.
Taxis: Fare 35 within city limits.
Ferry: S. end of Ave. C for Electric Ferry to Staten Island; car and passengers 25,
pedestrians 5.
Toll Bridge: Hudson County Blvd. and W. 7th St. for Staten Island; car and pas
sengers 50, pedestrians 5.
Traffic Regulations: On Boulevard, stop on nearest corner on red or amber light;
1-hour parking in business district (Broadway) between 9 a.m. and 6 p.m.
Accommodations: Rooming houses.
Information Service: Chamber of Commerce, 51 E. 22nd St.
Motion Picture Houses: Six.
Swimming: Bayonne Y.M.C.A., W. 33rd St. between Ave. C and Boulevard; Indus
trial Y.M.C.A., 259 Ave. E; open-air pool, W. 63rd St. and Boulevard; Newark
Bay at County Park, Ave. C and W. 40th St.
Tennis: City Park at W. 18th St.; County Park, Ave. C and W. 40th St.
Baseball: City Stadium, W. 14th St. and Ave. A.

BAYONNE (40 alt., 88,979 pop.) is the eastern end of the Nation's longest oil-pipe lines -- the oil-refining center of the State. It is an isolated community of low, crowded buildings, lying on the tip of the peninsula that separates New York Bay from Newark Bay. Although it is closer to New York than are Newark or Elizabeth, it lags in reflecting the influence of the metropolis. Bayonne, in fact, at present has no hotel. Houses pack the streets so tightly that there is not even space for a cemetery.

On all sides but its northern boundary, where it merges into Jersey City, Bayonne is surrounded by water. On the map the city looks like a boot. The toe is Constable Hook and it juts into New York Bay where oil tankers rock at company wharves. The sole of the boot is Kill van Kull. The heel is Virgin Point, where Kill van Kull joins Newark Bay.

Physiographically the city strings its three-mile length along a ridge that follows closely the straight shore line of Newark Bay and then slopes easily to the low marshy shores of New York Bay. Hudson Boulevard, running along the ridge from Jersey City to Kill van Kull, borders the eastern edge of the better residential district, which stretches along the high ground above Newark Bay. Bisecting the industrial section built along the foot portion of the boot, the boulevard crosses Bayonne Bridge into Staten Island. The business center, paralleling the boulevard, is part way down the slope.

Outside the magnificent view across Newark Bay clear to Newark and Elizabeth, Bayonne has little of the unusual to offer the sightseeing visitor

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