New Jersey: A Guide to Its Present and Past

By Federal Writers' Project (N.J.) | Go to book overview

Morristown
Railroad Station: Lackawanna Station, Morris and Elm Sts., for Lackawanna R.R.
Bus Station: Park Pl. N. for De Camp, Public Service, and interurban lines.
Taxis: 35 for one passenger, 50 for two, 250 for each additional passenger within city limits.
Traffic Regulations: Traffic lights in business section. Watch signs for parking limitations and one-way streets. All traffic around the park is counter-clockwise.
Accommodations: Small hotels and tourist houses; no seasonal rates.
Information Service: Bus Terminal, 77 Park Pl.; Chamber of Commerce, io Park Pl.; Morristown Library, SW. corner Miller Rd. and South St.; information bureau on Park Pl. N., April through October.
Motion Picture Houses: Three.
Swimming: Municipal pool, Burnham Park, seasonal rates; 250 for children, 50 for adults, lockers free; health certificate by local physician required.
Annual Events: Water carnival and ice carnival at Burnham Park; Firemen's Parade, October.

It was once the boast of MORRISTOWN (400 alt., 15,197 pop.), a town with an extraordinary heritage from Revolutionary times, that within a radius of one mile from the Green lived more millionaires than in any other equal area in the world. It may not have been true. But this Colonial town is still marked by obvious signs of the extreme wealth brought here in the mauve decade and the years following.

Many of the millionaires long ago left for the more exclusive hills of nearby Bernardsville, Bedminster, Peapack, and Far Hills, where they could escape the annoyance of heavy automobile traffic. A number of the great houses were emptied during the depression, when the second generation was unable or unwilling to maintain them. Homes that cost hundreds of thousands were torn down to escape the burden of taxes, or sold at bargain prices (in one instance for less than the cost of the greenhouse) and remodeled on a smaller scale.

Today Morristown is being taken over by the well-to-do middle class. The change is welcomed by businessmen. As one banker commented, "It is better for Morristown to have 20 families in $15,000 or $20,000 homes than one millionaire on 20 acres."

Morristown spreads along both banks of the narrow Whippany River, partly occupying the shoulder of Mount Kemble, with a 597-foot peak, Fort Nonsense, in the city limits. Gillespie Hill is westward, Horse Hill to the north, and Normandy Heights to the east. From this snug setting roads radiate through the well-kept acres of gentlemen farmers to the surrounding communities.

Although only forty-fifth in size among the cities of New Jersey, Mor

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New Jersey: A Guide to Its Present and Past
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Sponsors' Forewords v
  • Preface vii
  • Contents xi
  • Illustrations xv
  • Maps xxi
  • General Information xxiii
  • Calendar of Events xxix
  • Part I - New Jersey: the General View 1
  • A New Jersey Silhouette 3
  • Natural Setting 7
  • Archeology and Indians 28
  • History 35
  • Government 55
  • Industry and Commerce 69
  • Labor 79
  • Agriculture 89
  • The Press 110
  • Racial and National Groups 118
  • Folklore and Folkways 126
  • Education 134
  • Religion 142
  • The Arts 151
  • Part II - Cities and Towns 187
  • Atlantic City 189
  • Bayonne 201
  • Bordentown 207
  • Burlington 216
  • Camden 225
  • Elizabeth 238
  • Freehold 250
  • Hackensack 256
  • Hoboken 262
  • Jersey City 270
  • Morristown 283
  • Mount Holly 292
  • New Brunswick 298
  • Newark 312
  • The Oranges and Maplewood 339
  • Passaic 345
  • Paterson 349
  • Perth Amboy 361
  • Princeton 370
  • Salem 390
  • Trenton 398
  • Part III - Tours 415
  • Part IV - Appendices 687
  • Bibliography 697
  • Index 705
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