New Jersey: A Guide to Its Present and Past

By Federal Writers' Project (N.J.) | Go to book overview

Princeton
Railroad Station: Princeton Station, foot of University Pl., for Pennsylvania R.R.
Bus Station: 182 Nassau St. for Trenton Transit Co. and Greyhound; Bayard Lane and Stockton St. for Somerset Bus Co. (No local service.)
Taxis: One passenger within borough limits, 35¢; more than one passenger, 25¢ each.
Streetcars: Witherspoon and Spring Sts. for Trenton and Princeton Transit Co. (No local service.)
Accommodations: Two hotels; numerous inns, tourist homes, boarding houses.
Information Service: Princeton Travel Bureau, University Store, on campus W. of Nassau Hall; Borough Hall, Stockton St. opposite Princeton Battle Monument.
Theater and Motion Picture Houses: McCarter Theater; 3 motion picture houses.
Swimming: Brokaw Memorial Pool, open to townspeople during summer.
Skating: Hobart Baker Rink, open Tues. and Thurs. evenings, Sat. morning (adm. 40¢).
Boating: Carnegie Lake, Washington Rd., for crew racing and canoeing.
Golf: Springdale Golf Club, Stockton Pl. and College Rd.; greens fee, $2 week. days, $3 Sat., Sun. and holidays; $1.50 and $2 when accompanied by member.
Baseball: University Field, Olden St. and Prospect Ave.
Annual Events: All-Star Ice Carnival of Princeton Nursery School at Baker Rink in February; Talbott Music Festival of Westminster Choir School, Princeton Interscholastic Track Meet, both at Palmer Stadium during May; Princeton Interscholastic Tennis Championships, on university courts, May; Invitation Track Meet, Palmer Stadium, June; athletic contests at announced dates during collegiate year; Princeton Commencement Week, usually third week in June.

PRINCETON (200 alt., 6,992 pop.) lives for Princeton University. A division between town and campus cannot be made. The gates to the campus open on Nassau Street, the main thoroughfare, lined with shops that blazon the orange and black Tiger colors; the railroad station follows the collegiate Gothic style of the newer university buildings; stores, boarding houses and hotels cater largely to Princeton men and their guests. Townspeople cheer Princeton football teams, attend commencements and gather for Princeton entertainments.

The aristocracy of the village, including resident Princeton graduates and trustees of the university, mingles freely with the faculty, forming a mature social group that serves as a stabilizing influence for the continuous flow of youth.

The old order is deeply rooted in the eighteenth century village, spread along a low ridge in one of the most pleasantly green sections of the State, but the bright scions of the twentieth century have been grafted onto the little town. Filling stations and lubritoriums elbow antique shops and old houses along Nassau Street where horns once sounded in the days of coach racing; and glistening store fronts yield abruptly at the second-floor level to age-darkened original clapboard.

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New Jersey: A Guide to Its Present and Past
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Sponsors' Forewords v
  • Preface vii
  • Contents xi
  • Illustrations xv
  • Maps xxi
  • General Information xxiii
  • Calendar of Events xxix
  • Part I - New Jersey: the General View 1
  • A New Jersey Silhouette 3
  • Natural Setting 7
  • Archeology and Indians 28
  • History 35
  • Government 55
  • Industry and Commerce 69
  • Labor 79
  • Agriculture 89
  • The Press 110
  • Racial and National Groups 118
  • Folklore and Folkways 126
  • Education 134
  • Religion 142
  • The Arts 151
  • Part II - Cities and Towns 187
  • Atlantic City 189
  • Bayonne 201
  • Bordentown 207
  • Burlington 216
  • Camden 225
  • Elizabeth 238
  • Freehold 250
  • Hackensack 256
  • Hoboken 262
  • Jersey City 270
  • Morristown 283
  • Mount Holly 292
  • New Brunswick 298
  • Newark 312
  • The Oranges and Maplewood 339
  • Passaic 345
  • Paterson 349
  • Perth Amboy 361
  • Princeton 370
  • Salem 390
  • Trenton 398
  • Part III - Tours 415
  • Part IV - Appendices 687
  • Bibliography 697
  • Index 705
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