The Writings of Mao Zedong, 1949-1976 - Vol. 1

By Michael Y. M. Kau; John K. Leung et al. | Go to book overview

development and improvement of the various minority nationalities is a hopeful matter.

The political, economic, cultural and religious development of Tibet must be carried out primarily on the shoulders of the leaders and people of Tibet themselves and through the discussions [among themselves]; the Center can only give assistance. This is an item written into the Agreement on the Methods for the Peaceful Liberation of Tibet. 3 However, it will be some time before [these things] can be carried out, and, moreover, [they] must be carried out on the basis of your volition, and gradually. Whatever can be done will be done; if something cannot be done [as yet,] we will wait a bit. If there is something that can be done, and on which the majority has agreed, it would not be good not to get it done. [However,] it can be done somewhat slowly, so that everyone will be happy about it, and, in that way, in reality it may actually [be done] more quickly. In any case, our policy is one of being united in our progress and further development.


Notes
1.
The Olunchun people is a tribal people residing in Inner Mongolia. By the mid-1960s they have actually reached a population of only 2,400-2,500.
2.
See text Feb. 10, 1953, note 2.
3.
See text May 24, 1951, source note.

Letter to Yang Shangkun
(October 22, 1953)

Source: Shuxin, p. 469.

See text May 19, 1953, source note; see also text Nov. 22, 1950, note 4.

Comrade Shangkun:

Please take the six points in the conclusion of [the book] Liangong dang shi (History of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union [Bolshevik]) 1 and print them as a single leaflet to be sent tonight or tomorrow to the various comrades attending the organizational meeting. 2 Please ask them to make use of the two or three days recess in the meeting to read, study, and where possible, even discuss [these points], so that when Comrade Liu Shaoqi and others reach this issue in their speeches in the conference, they [the attending comrades] may

-421-

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