The West German Legislative Process: A Case Study of Two Transportation Bills

By Gerard Braunthal | Go to book overview

[APPENDIX A]
Chronology of the Two Transportation
Bills and Their Aftermath
1952-1953 The railroad crisis intensifies.
1953
March BFM and BVM authorize the preparation of two
bills.
April, May The Cabinet requests their postponement.
June 3 Deputies introduce their own bills into the Bundestag.
July 7 Committees approve the bills, but no second and
third readings are scheduled. The Cabinet requests
new drafts.
August The first draft of the new TFB is completed and
circulated to ministries.
September 6 National election: CDU/ CSU gains 45 per cent of
the popular vote.
October 8 Globke rejects Cabinet consideration of TFB as
premature.
October 20 A Cabinet is formed, including 11 CDU/ CSU, 4
FDP, 2 DP, 2 BHE members; Seebohm is reappointed
Minister of Transportation. Adenauer's "state of
the union" message is given to the Bundestag.
October,
 November
BFM, BVM, and the Bundesbahn meet to discuss
TFB and HRB.
November 11 Interministerial conference.
December 18 Cabinet discussion of the bills is postponed.
1954
January 13 SPD introduces four resolutions on transportation
into the Bundestag.
January 14 BFM requests a special Cabinet session.

-251-

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